Black Watch


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Black Watch

or

Royal Highland Regiment,

Scottish infantry regiment. The first companies were raised in 1725 to watch the rebellious Scottish highlands and keep the peace, and the regiment was formed 1739–40. It became known as the Black Watch because of the dark colors of the regimental tartan. It was for a time the 43d, but after 1749 it was the 42d regiment. In 2006 a military reorganization made the Black Watch the 3d Battalion of the Royal Regiment of Scotland.
References in periodicals archive ?
They were led by 60 pipers from the Belgian Red Hackles, the Passchendale and the Field Marshal Haig Pipes & Drums and accompanied by three pipers from the Black Watch.
And his moving war journal provides the only Black Watch diary account of the conflict during September and October 1914, the period leading up to the carnage at Nonne Bosschen, known since then as Black Watch Corner.
The Black Watch was founded in 1739 and got its name because of the dark color of the tartan its members wore, and its job of "watching" (keeping peace and order) in the Highlands of Scotland.
Black Watch is based on real interviews with soldiers
And her SNP colleague Pete Wishart, MP for the area, added: "The Black Watch is synonymous with Perthshire and the whole county will be in shock.
The oldest Highland regiment, with roots dating back to the 18th century, the Black Watch -- named for the black tartan its members wear -- was as much a local industry as mining and ship building, according to Burke.
Captain Brian Cooper, Officer Commanding of the Black Watch Battalion recruiting team, said: "We are deeply honoured to be receiving the Freedom of Fife.
The Black Watch march through Warminster on their way to church
He must do EVERYTHING he can not to put more British soldiers at the extra risk the Black Watch faced which means standing up to George Bush.
Defence Secretary Geoff Hoon is expected to confirm that the Black Watch will be merged into a single Scottish 'super regiment'.
Most of the attacks on the Black Watch came in the early stages of their mission, at a time when their redeployment to US-controlled central Iraq was the subject of intense media attention, he said.
The controversial decision to deploy the Black Watch regiment into the so-called triangle of death, the Sunny Muslim insurgent stronghold, echoes a similar ill-thought out deployment in 1916, also in Iraq, in which Middlesbrough man Stephen Burton Holmes, of the 2nd Battalion the Black Watch, perished and is commemorated on the Basra war memorial, Southern Iraq.