Black Woodpecker


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Black Woodpecker

 

(Dryocopus martius), a bird of the family Picidae. Approximately the size of a crow (up to 50 cm in length), the black woodpecker has black plumage and a red head. Its straight, brightly colored bill is powerful and has a chisel-shaped point. A sedentary species, the black woodpecker nests in tree hollows that it gouges out itself. There are three to five glossy, white-shelled eggs in a clutch. The bird inhabits the coniferous forests of Europe and Asia. It obtains its food (insects and their larvae) by hollowing out the bark and wood of trees, particularly of tree stumps. The bird is useful since it destroys insects that are forest pests. However, in their search for large ants (Camponotus) that live in the rotting heartwood of tree trunks, black woodpeckers sometimes damage fresh spruce timber by gouging out deep holes.

References in periodicals archive ?
I saw none, but great and clean-cut circular holes in the trunks of dead and dying trees may have been hewn by Europe's largest woodpecker, the Black Woodpecker.
However, this does not cover significant parts of the habitats of 17 endangered bird species listed in Annex I of the Birds Directive, thus putting at risk the conservation of species such as Tengmalm's Boreal's owl (Aegolius funereus) and the Eurasian pygmy owl (Glaucidium passerinum), as well as the white-backed woodpecker (Dendrocopos leucotos), the three-toed woodpecker (Picoudes tridactilus), the hazel grouse (Bonasa bonasia) and the black woodpecker (Dryocopus martius).
With respect to mutations postulated to explain the observation and for woodpeckers in general, schizochroism was reported in the Black Woodpecker (Dryocopus martius) of the Old World (Jackson 1999), while no accounts of brown or dilution were revealed in the literature.
The mountain slopes and high woodlands also hold other species which aren't present in the UK, such as citril finch, alpine accentor, black woodpecker and alpine chough.
A modest mess compared to the wreckage left by the larger, more impressive black woodpecker of the continent - when they attack a tree it looks like they've used a chainsaw and/or dynamite.
The various habitats are also important for birds, including: woodlarks, Bewick s swan, black woodpeckers, little grebe, black-necked grebe, whinchat, common stonechat, shovelers, wheatears and teal.