Black-Winged Stilt


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Related to Black-Winged Stilt: whimbrel, Common Sandpiper

Black-Winged Stilt

 

(Himantopus himantopus), a bird of the family Charadriidae of the suborder Limicolae. The body length is about 37 cm. The plumage is white and black. The legs are very long and pink, and the bill is black. The black-winged stilt is distributed in southern Europe, southern Asia, Africa, Australia, New Zealand, and America (except in the north). In the USSR it is found in the south, from the Danube to Lake Zaisan, living along the shores of freshwater and salt lakes and the sea. It nests in colonies. A clutch contains four eggs, which are incubated 25 to 26 days. The black-winged stilt feeds on aquatic insects and other invertebrates and on frog and fish eggs; in winter it also feeds on the seeds of aquatic plants.

References in periodicals archive ?
The black-winged stilts are incubating four eggs on an island at the Wildfowl and Wetland trust - the first recorded incident of the birds ever breeding in the region.
It may be a while before we see Black-winged Stilts nesting closer to home, however.
Birds such as the Siberian Crane, Greater Flamingo, Ruff, Black-winged Stilt, Common Teal, Common Greenshank, Northern Pintail, Wagtail, Wagtail, Northern Shoveler, Rosy Pelican and Gadwall, usually migrate to wetlands in India.
Khan told Gulf News that "in the last week, the nesting of black-winged stilt (Himantupos himantupos) was observed in some areas of the sanctuary.
A rare black-winged stilt reeding at at altitudes of over 700m.
Oroklini Lake is a very important area for birds and especially for the breeding of Spur-winged Lapwing and the Black-winged Stilt.
Oroklini Lake is a Natura 2000 site -- part of the EU's conservation scheme -- and is significant for two qualifying bird species: the Black-winged Stilt and the Spur-winged Plover that nest there.
It comes in the same summer that three pairs of Black-winged Stilts nested in southern and eastern England, and young Bee-eaters fledged on the Isle of Wight.