augmentation

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Related to Bladder augmentation: Mitrofanoff, augmentation cystoplasty

augmentation

The difference at a particular time between the topocentric and geocentric semidiameter of a celestial body. See also diurnal libration.

augmentation

[‚ȯg·mən′tā·shən]
(astronomy)
The apparent increase in the semidiameter of a celestial body, as observed from the earth, as the body's altitude (angular distance above the horizon) increases, due to the reduced distance from the observer; used principally in reference to the moon.
References in periodicals archive ?
Several publications reported unfavourable evolution, such as complete bladder fibrosis with reduced compliance requiring aggressive surgical treatments, such as bladder augmentation or cystectomy.
A refluxing and/or obstructive megaureter features a satisfactory amount of tissue for bladder augmentation.
No difference could be detected macroscopically between the regenerated and the normal bladder epithelium by cystoscopy in porcine, where bladder augmentation was done using allogenic acellular dermis (24).
The bladder-management types covered were: intermittent catheterization, Crede and Valsalva, indwelling catheters, reflex voiding, neurostimulation, bladder augmentation, continent urinary diversion, urinary diversion, and cutaneous ileovesicostomy.
Ureterocystoplasty was introduced in the early 1990s and was considered a novel method of bladder augmentation surgery using detubularized, reconfigured, or otherwise disposable megaureter.
Soon, the bright and plucky youngster will have to undergo yet more surgery, a bladder augmentation procedure where a catheter tube will be fitted through her bellybutton and into her bladder.
Bladder augmentation is indicated when the resident has a very small bladder capacity and high voiding pressures.
Following encouraging results in pigs, human trials will begin next year in patients requiring bladder augmentation, rather than complete bladder replacement, according to Berhard Brehmer, PhD of Aachen Technical College in Berlin.
The success rates of bladder augmentation with collagen injection in men are not as good as for women.
Before the introduction of InterStim Therapy in the late 1990s, treatment options for these problems were limited to medication, biofeedback and pelvic floor exercises at the start of the care continuum, and irreversible surgical procedures such as bladder augmentation, bladder removals and urinary diversions at the end.
The options include bladder augmentation, as well as continent and noncontinent urinary diversion.
This provides an alternative therapy prior to more invasive procedures, such as sacral nerve stimulation and bladder augmentation.