Blanche of Castile


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Blanche of Castile

(bläNsh, kăstēl`), 1185?–1252, queen of Louis VIII of France and regent during the minority (1226–34) of their son Louis IXLouis IX
or Saint Louis,
1214–70, king of France (1226–70), son and successor of Louis VIII. His mother, Blanche of Castile, was regent during his minority (1226–34), and her regency probably lasted even after Louis reached his majority; she was his
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. A forceful and capable ruler, she checked the coalitions of the great lords and frustrated the attempt (1230) of Henry IIIHenry III,
1207–72, king of England (1216–72), son and successor of King John. Reign
Early Years

Henry became king under a regency; William Marshal, 1st earl of Pembroke, and later Pandulf acted as chief of government, while Peter des Roches
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 of England to regain his father's lands in France. She remained a lifelong adviser to Louis IX, was again regent on his departure (1248) for the Holy Land, and was coregent with her son Alphonse from 1250 until her death.
References in periodicals archive ?
Contract notice: Renovation of 180 housing units and construction of 33 homes in the middle-bottom busy at 1-11 rue ronsard, 13-19 rue charles de foucault and 91-105 rue blanche of castile in poissy (78).
Between these, in well painted Gothic niches interspersed by columns, stand three gilt spelter figures: the central figure is of Christ enthroned, to his right stands Saint Louis, King of France (in addition to holding his customary crown of thorns, he has a hand-topped staff as depicted in his portrait by El Greco), to Christ's left stands a queen or saint holding an orb and purse - she may represent Queen Margaret of Provence or, more probably, Queen Blanche of Castile, Louis' mother.
While this is clearly the case when one looks to the examples McCartney cites (such as the iconography of Blanche of Castile, where framing devices such as columns separate mother from son), I would argue for the importance of a further nuance in the tenor of the connection in the "Compass.