Blast-Furnace Gas

blast-furnace gas

[′blast ‚fər·nəs ‚gas]
(materials)
The gas product from iron ore smelting when hot air passes over coke in blast ovens; contains carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, hydrogen, and nitrogen and is used as fuel gas.

Blast-Furnace Gas

 

(top gas), the waste gas from blast furnaces; mainly the products of the incomplete combustion of carbon. Its chemical composition during the smelting of cast iron on coal coke is 12–20 percent carbon dioxide, 20–30 percent carbon monoxide, up to 0.5 percent methane, 1–4 percent hydrogen, and 55–58 percent nitrogen. Blast-furnace gas is utilized as a fuel in metallurgical works. The heat of combustion of blast-furnace gas is approximately 3.6–4.6 megajoules per cu m (850–1,100 kcal per cu m). When the blast is enriched with oxygen, the nitrogen content of the gas is lowered and the amount of other gases (including carbon monoxide and hydrogen), as well as the heat of combustion, increases correspondingly.

References in periodicals archive ?
The dew point of flue gas generated by the coke oven gas is the highest, followed by natural gas, fuel oil, blast-furnace gas and coal.
At the same time, a complementary industrial use of blast-furnace gas and coke oven gas would be possible, along with the development of the related industries.
The GTCC plants on order will use by-product gases from furnaces - specifically, FINEX gas, blast-furnace gas and coke-oven gas - as fuel.
Higley and his group are currently investigating the feasibility of capturing excess blast-furnace gas at several mills and converting that to process steam to run turbines.
The LOMAA combustion chamber will be equipped with a multiple lance burner that will enable it to use blast-furnace gas fuel for its main burner, with coke-oven gas being used for starting.
The new cogeneration plant will be fueled by natural gas and blast-furnace gas, a by-product of the steel-making process, and will provide electric power and steam for the Rouge Steel Co.