blending inheritance

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blending inheritance

[′blen·diŋ in′her·ə·təns]
(genetics)
Inheritance in which the character of the offspring is a blend of those in the parents; a common feature for quantitative characters, such as stature, determined by large numbers of genes and affected by environmental variation.
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This section also seems the most interdisciplinary; in addition to the terminological apparatus of the Blending Theory, Kalla refers to Gerard Genette's classification of texts.
Second, conceptual blending theory draws our attention particularly to the metaphoricity of topical identities, and hence to their capacity for aesthetic novelty, which literary critics in general have neglected.
Blending theory was developed by Mark Turner; it has been described and advanced, most recently, by Gilles Fauconnier and Mark Turner (2002) and Patrick Colm Hogan (2003).
2) To date, general accounts of blending theory have sometimes touched on instances of topical allusion, but without especially calling attention to its distinctive qualities.
Blending theory is consistent with the presumption that authors are agents, with minds and intentions.
As I make these points in favor of cognitivism, I bear in mind some challenges that have been mounted in recent years to the project of applying conceptual blending theory in literary-critical contexts.
Blending theory not only gives us a new theoretical vocabulary in which to discuss probable responses to a topical allusion, but actually helps us to recognize the essential creativity of responses that generate novel conceptual spaces, spaces structured by concepts which an audience has not previously been in the habit of blending.
Blending Basics (Linguistic Aspects of Conceptual Blending Theory and Conceptual Integration).
Literary critics may no doubt find blending theory useful for a number of things, but they might face what sociologists call "unknown unknowns.
Allegory has been a shaping force in the growth of blending theory, too.
The second edition has been revised and expanded to reflect developments in the field since publication of the 1996 edition, including an innovative description of the role played by metaphors and metonymies based on the notion of "mapping scope," a new section on construction grammar, a new chapter focusing on blending theory as an online processing strategy, expanded coverage of iconicity and cognitive linguistics in foreign language learning, and a survey of recent attempts to put linguistic theorizing on a safer psychological and neurological footing.
Kowalski, a former school superintendent and professor of educational administration, outlines the evolution of the school district superintendent position, blending theory and the practicalities of contemporary practice.