blood bank

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blood bank,

site or mobile unit for collecting, processing, typing, and storing whole bloodblood,
fluid pumped by the heart that circulates throughout the body via the arteries, veins, and capillaries (see circulatory system; heart). An adult male of average size normally has about 6 quarts (5.6 liters) of blood.
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, blood plasma and other blood constituents. Most hospitals maintain their own blood reserves, and the American Red Cross provides a nationwide collection and distribution service. The Red Cross collects about 50% of the blood for the nation's blood banks. The Food and Drug AdministrationFood and Drug Administration
(FDA), agency of the Public Health Service division of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. It is charged with protecting public health by ensuring that foods are safe and pure, cosmetics and other chemical substances harmless, and
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 licenses blood banks.

Whole blood may be preserved for up to 21 days without losing its usefulness in blood transfusionsblood transfusion,
transfer of blood from one person to another, or from one animal to another of the same species. Transfusions are performed to replace a substantial loss of blood and as supportive treatment in certain diseases and blood disorders.
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; an anticoagulant is added to prevent clotting. Blood plasma, the fluid portion of the blood, may be frozen and/or dried and stored indefinitely. Blood and donors are screened for hepatitishepatitis
, inflammation of the liver. There are many types of hepatitis. Causes include viruses, toxic chemicals, alcohol consumption, parasites and bacteria, and certain drugs.
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, AIDSAIDS
or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome,
fatal disease caused by a rapidly mutating retrovirus that attacks the immune system and leaves the victim vulnerable to infections, malignancies, and neurological disorders. It was first recognized as a disease in 1981.
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, malariamalaria,
infectious parasitic disease that can be either acute or chronic and is frequently recurrent. Malaria is common in Africa, Central and South America, the Mediterranean countries, Asia, and many of the Pacific islands.
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, and other infectious diseases. The potential risk of acquiring AIDS or hepatitis through transfusions has made it a common practice among patients anticipating surgery to "bank" their own blood before it is needed.

Many blood banks also have facilities for apheresisapheresis
, or hemapheresis
, any procedure in which blood is drawn from a donor or patient and a component (platelets, plasma, or white blood cells) is separated out, the remaining blood components being returned to the body.
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, bone marrow donations, and related procedures. Some centers save umbilical cord blood (blood that is especially rich in stem cellsstem cells,
unspecialized human or animal cells that can produce mature specialized body cells and at the same time replicate themselves. Embryonic stem cells are derived from a blastocyst (the blastula typical of placental mammals; see embryo), which is very young embryo that
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) for use in treatments; however, the cost of preparing and storing such blood is much higher than that of normal blood. Sometimes parents store their newborn's cord blood at a private cord blood bank in case the child has need of it, but the use of one own's cord blood is ineffective or undesirable in many diseases where such blood is used as a treatment.

Blood Bank

 

in the USSR, a medical establishment that supervises medical facilities in the processing and transfusion of blood. Blood banks establish donor networks, keep records on and perform medical examinations of donors, and process and store blood and blood preparations and substitutes (and sometimes bone marrow) and distribute them to hospitals and clinics. Together with organizations of the Union of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies of the USSR, blood banks conduct active educational and organizational work to attract people into becoming donors (for example, donor’s days are organized). Blood banks promote the use of new techniques of blood transfusion and the use of new blood preparations and substitutes in hospitals and clinics. They also train physicians and paramedics and supervise the blood-transfusion work performed in hospitals and clinics.

Blood banks are under the jurisdiction of corresponding public-health departments and supervised by institutes of blood transfusion on procedures and organizational matters.

blood bank

[′bləd ‚baŋk]
(engineering)
A place for storing whole blood or plasma under refrigeration.

blood bank

a place where whole blood, blood plasma, or other blood products are stored until required in transfusion
References in periodicals archive ?
Meanwhile, during the raids conducted at various illegal blood banks, stolen blood bags were recovered from one laboratory situated opposite the THQ Hospital Daska.
Sushil Jathanna, chairman, IRCS' Blood Bank Committee said that the helpline, which will become operational from Tuesday, will also direct the public to the nearest blood bank where the particular blood group is available.
Summary: DHA says the Abu Dhabi Blood Bank and Sharjah Blood Bank are no longer able to supply blood and blood products to the facilities outside the respective Emirates.
Al Sindi said that the blood bank in KHUH communicates constantly with blood banks in the GCC, especially the blood bank in Kuwait, which is one of the blood banks that adopt advanced international standards.
However, while government blood banks charge a nominal fee from patients of private hospitals, private hospitals do not accept blood from government blood banks.
Al-Amoudi said blood banks in Jeddah are currently experiencing an acute shortage of O- type blood, which is rare globally, with only eight bottles in storage.
Although there is a prevalence of blood banks, most do not possess secure environments for storing cord blood.
In partnership with the local authorities, Merlin will be developing an emergency preparedness plan for all blood banks within the Gaza Strip, with the Ministry of Health's blood banks as the lead supplier of blood for all.
The study was carried out in the blood bank of a 600-bed teaching hospital in Sydney, Australia, which provides a networked blood banking service throughout a large metropolitan area and is involved in the investigation of antibodies and transfusion-related issues.
An important job for people working at a blood bank is to encourage people 17 years or older to donate blood.
So why don't blood banks increase their efforts to recruit new donors?
Though the risk of contracting West Nile through blood transfusion is slight, health officials moved to create a screening test that was implemented in early July by blood banks nationwide.