venipuncture

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venipuncture

[′ven·ə‚pəŋk·chər]
(medicine)
A surgical puncture of a vein, such as for withdrawing blood or injecting medication.
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The blood draw experience has long been the Achilles heel in the health and wellness market and we believe the Drawbridge solution has the potential to both improve the customer experience and provide health insights to more patients than ever before.
For the study, they recruited patients, ages 10 to 21 years, the patient's caregiver and the phlebotomist in the outpatient blood draw clinic, and randomized them to receive either standard of care, which typically includes a topical anesthetic cream or spray and a movie playing in the room, or standard of care plus the virtual reality game when undergoing routine blood draw.
Blood cell counts and assessments of liver and kidney function are unlikely to be significantly affected based on when you ate prior to a blood draw.
they have ever become lightheaded during a blood draw.
McNeely, (19) the Supreme Court of Missouri took its turn at interpreting Schmerber and stated that the rapid dissipation of alcohol in an individual's bloodstream by itself is not a "special fact" justifying a warrantless and nonconsensual blood draw on an alleged drunk driver.
52) The police officer that accompanied the intoxicated van driver to the emergency room asked the second AEMT to administer a blood draw to determine the van driver's blood alcohol content.
Blood draw information for 221 individuals were analyzed.
In the traumatically injured patient population, repeated blood draws and analysis for hemoglobin concentration (Hb) are widely utilized to evaluate blood loss and hemodynamic state.
By adapting the clinic blood draw appointment time to accommodate this employed patient, one of the outcome criterion was met.
1933(1)(b) seems relatively precise, the dearth of Florida case law on the subject may propagate uncertainty among law enforcement officers, as well as practicing attorneys, regarding when a forced blood draw under [section] 316.
Presumably the cut-off value for counting drug failure should be adjusted if the second blood draw is at, for example, 7 days, although the paper did not discuss this.
The court noted that Registered Nurse Sabine Niedzwiecki testified for the patient as an expert regarding the standard of care for blood draw procedures.