bleeding

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bleeding

[′blēd·iŋ]
(chemical engineering)
The undesirable movement of certain components of a plastic material to the surface of a finished article. Also known as migration.
(engineering)
Natural separation of a liquid from a liquid-solid or semisolid mixture; for example, separation of oil from a stored lubricating grease, or water from freshly poured concrete. Also known as bleedout.
(materials)
The outward penetration of a coloring agent from a substrate through the surface coat of paint.
The movement of grout through a pavement from below a road surfacing material to the outer surface.
(textiles)
Referring to a fabric in which the dye is not fast and therefore comes out when the fabric is wet.

bleeding

1. The upward penetration of a coloring pigment from a substrate through a topcoat of paint.
2. The oozing of grout from below a road-surfacing material to the surface in hot weather.
3. Exudation of one or more components of a sealant, with possible absorption by adjacent porous surfaces.
4. The autogenous flow of mixing water within, or its emergence from, newly placed concrete or mortar; caused by the settlement of the solid materials within the mass or by drainage of mixing water; also called water gain.
5. The diffusion of coloring matter through a coating from the substrate, or the discoloration that arises from such a process.
References in periodicals archive ?
HackensackUMC is the first hospital in the United States to integrate Triton -- the world's first and only FDA-cleared technology for real-time monitoring of surgical blood loss -- with the Department of Obstetrics' electronic medical record (EMR) system, Epic -- in order to determine Quantified Blood Loss (QBL) in patients.
25) Aprotinin's ability to decrease blood loss and ABT in cardiac surgery patients promoted its regular use and utilization by other specialties, specifically thoracic, vascular, transplant, and orthopaedic surgery.
The outcome measures in both groups included the operative time, intra and post-operative blood loss, post-operative hemoglobin concentration, intra and post-operative blood pressure and body temperature over the post-operative 7 days.
The attending surgeon who performed all of the hysterectomies was very experienced, which likely helped achieve fairly low estimated blood loss in general, according to Dr.
The reason for this association is unknown, but it may be attributed to individual surgical skill and familiarity with the procedure resulting in reduced blood loss, and therefore, decreased reliance on topical agents.
The amount of blood loss ranged from 200 to 5,000 ml (mean: 1,800) in the type III cases and from 700 to 8,000 ml (mean: 2,850) in the type IV cases.
2) demonstrated a decrease from 211 ml down to 123 ml in blood loss per percentage of body surface surgery.
The inquest heard Mr Wynn suffered massive blood loss caused by a tear to the aorta which may have been brought on by an untreated leak at the site of the surgery.
We modeled the potential metabolic impact on protein and energy balance of moose calves associated with blood loss during four levels, low to severe, of winter tick infestation.
The inquest heard the splinter split her jugular vein, causing heavy blood loss and she died soon after arriving in hospital.
Let us count the ways: 1) chipped, cracked or fractured front teeth that can only be repaired with fillings or crowns, 2) infection that easily spreads throughout the body, 3) risk of disease, such as hepatitis, 4) blood loss from broken vessels, 5) irreversible nerve damage, 6) barbells wearing away at gums, which can lead to tooth loss, 7) scars, cysts and a second tongue, a large lump adjacent to the piercing.