Bluebeard

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Related to Blue beard: Gilgamesh

Bluebeard,

nickname of the chevalier Raoul in a story by Charles Perrault. In the story Bluebeard's seventh wife, Fatima, yielding to curiosity, opens a locked door and discovers the slain bodies of her predecessors. She is saved from death by the timely arrival of her brothers, for whose coming her sister Anne has been watching from a tower. Breton tradition links Bluebeard with the seigneur de Retz, but the story occurs in the folklore of several countries.

Bluebeard

closets away bodies of former wives. [Fr. Fairy Tale: Harvey, 97–98]
See: Murder

Bluebeard

(Henri Désiré Landru, 1869–1922) executed for murders of ten women (1915–18). [Fr. Hist.: EB (1972), XIII, 661
See: Murder

Bluebeard

chevalier slays his six wives; seventh evades similar fate. [Fr. Fairy Tale: Harvey, 96–97]

Bluebeard

murders six wives; a personification of wickedness. [Fr. Lit.: Walsh Classical, 58]
References in periodicals archive ?
Clearly the revival of Blue Beard did well; but closer inspection of Covent Garden's calendar of plays for January and February of 1811 shows that this was a season of unusual successes.
As is well known, the equestrian Blue Beard elicited intense resistance in the press as a devolution in public taste.
Blue Beard integrated these elements into a larger narrative and crucially supplied a scenic context that maximized the virtuosity of the horse's exertions (fig.
Because this sublation was out of step with historical events, both within Scott's narrative and on the ground in Spain--Wellington would not move for some months yet--the cavalry episodes in Blue Beard become that much more resonant.
BARRYMORE, in the grand equestrian attack in Blue Beard is killed by Proxy.
But the crucial thing about Lodi is its pastness: it has been superseded by the final bridge scene in Blue Beard, which is now beginning to carry the weight of theatrical prophecy.
On 28 February, about two weeks into the run of Blue Beard, Astley began offering the following extravaganza:
This diverse entertainment was staged repeatedly at the same time that Covent Garden was running Blue Beard and preparing to open Timour the Tartar, and it allows us to be more precise about the axiological and affective significance of equestrian performance.
In this inversion of the conventional axiological paradigm, the problem lies in pairing mainpieces like Cato, The Knight of Snowdoun, Henry V and other Shakespearean plays, with Blue Beard.
If we can discern a militaristic logic in the relation between The Knight of Snowdoun and the equestrian Blue Beard, the brief divagation to Astley's reminds us of the importance of not only feminine vulnerability but also spatial displacement to this patriotic fantasy.
Blue Beard ends with Abomelique being felled by the very mechanism he has built to guard the bloody chamber: the dart-wielding Skeleton stabs Abomelique and he disappears into the stage via a trapdoor amidst an explosion of flame and smoke.
Blue Beard had many wives who he murdered and kept their memories in his home.