Bene Beraq

(redirected from Bnei Brak)
Also found in: Wikipedia.

Bene Beraq

or

Bene Berak

(both: bē`nē bē`răk), town (1994 pop. 127,100), central Israel, near Tel Aviv. Famous for its academy under Rabbi Akiba's direction, it had six Talmudic academies by the 1990s. It is a suburb of Tel Aviv; its population is predominantly Orthodox Jewish.
References in periodicals archive ?
A Bnei Brak man was arrested recently and questioned by police after he filmed himself destroying tefillin (phylacteries) and broadcast the recording over social media networks in protest of what he called "religious coercion" in Israel.
was founded in 1972 and is based in Bnei Brak, Israel.
They left their home on Friday afternoon, rushing to catch the transportation arranged by their families to a Sheva Brachot meal in Bnei Brak, about an hour away by car.
Headquartered in Bnei Brak, Israel, Orpak offers technology solutions to oil companies and commercial fleets.
The 24km Red Line will link Tel Aviv's mainline station in Petah Tikva with Bnei Brak, Jaffa, and Bat Yam with 34 stations, 10 of them underground.
The speakers included three guests from the Holy Land, Rabbi Yaakov Davidowitz of Jerusalem, Rabbi Shmiel Noah Weinberg of Bnei Brak and Rabbi Yonah Eichler of Beis Shemesh, who described the difficult situation faced by the Orthodox living there.
Each tribe also has its own towns: Tel Aviv is the town of one tribe, just as Umm el Fahm is the town of another, as is Efrat, and Bnei Brak.
Family and relatives of Yoav Hattab, a victim of the attack on a kosher grocery store in Paris, gather around a <Bsymbolic coffin for his funeral procession in the city of Bnei Brak near Tel Aviv, Israel
Alert sirens were sounded today in multiple Israeli cities, including Tel Aviv, Netivot, Rishon Lezion, Ashdod, Sderot, Be'er Sheva, Merhavim, Ramat Gan, Bnei Brak, Petah Tikva, Herzliya, Rehovot, Yavne, Nes Tziona, Lod, Ramle, Kiryat Malachi and Ashkelon, as well as occupied Jerusalem, Beit Shemesh and the Dead Sea area.
It takes place in an Orthodox religious Jewish neighborhood, Bnei Brak, where the culture of Orthodox Jews has been relatively out of sight for secular Israelis until recently.
Shortly before, the sirens had sounded for the fourth consecutive day in Tel Aviv, causing a panic in the Israeli metropolis and its environs of Bnei Brak and Ramat HaSharon.