Boccioni, Umberto


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Boccioni, Umberto

(o͞ombĕr`tō bŏt-chô`nē), 1882–1916, Italian futurist painter and sculptor. He played a primary role in the drafting of the manifesto of futurismfuturism,
Italian school of painting, sculpture, and literature that flourished from 1909, when Filippo Tommaso Marinetti's first manifesto of futurism appeared, until the end of World War I.
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 in 1910 and was the major figure in the movement until 1914. In his famous, characteristic painting, The City Rises (1910; Mus. of Modern Art, New York City), he interpreted powerfully the technological turbulence of modern civilization. Influenced by Medardo Rosso, Boccioni turned to sculpture in 1912 and sought to translate light and motion into mass. His sculpture Unique Forms of Continuity in Space (1913; Mus. of Modern Art) embodies his concept of "lines of force" to replace the use of straight lines.

Boccioni, Umberto

 

Born Oct. 19, 1882, in Reggio di Calabria; died Aug. 16, 1916, in Verona. Italian painter and sculptor. Boccioni studied in Rome (1898–1902) with G. Baila. At the beginning of his career he was close to verism; later he came under the influence of cubism, and from 1910 was the leader and theoretician of futurism in Italian art. In his subjectivist works, Boccioni attempted to embody an abstract feeling of the dynamism of the industrial era by the vortex-like movement of the intersecting forms and planes. Among his notable works are the painting The City Arises (1910, National Gallery of Modern Art, Rome) and the sculpture Unique Forms of Continuity in Space (bronze, 1913, Museum of Modern Art, New York).

REFERENCE

Argan, G. C. Umberto Boccioni. Rome, 1953.
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