Bohemianism


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Bohemianism

Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas, The
Gertrude Stein’s memoir of Paris’ Bohemia. [Am. Lit.: Stein The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas in Benét, 66]
Bloomsbury
section of London where, in the first half of the 20th century, a group of artists and intellectuals frequently congregated. [Br. Culture: Benét, 115]
Greenwich Village
area of southern Manhattan long identified with artists and writers. [Am. Culture: Misc.]
Haight-Ashbury
neighborhood in San Francisco associated with beatnicks and “flower people” in the 1960s. [Am. Culture: Misc.]
Latin Quarter
section of Paris on left bank of the Seine; home of students, artists, and writers. [Fr. Culture: EB, VI: 71–72]
Olenska, Countess Ellen
often considers divorce; likes “unacceptable” people. [Am. Lit.: The Age of Innocence]
SoHo
bohemian neighborhood So(uth of) Ho(uston Street), New York City. [Am. Culture: Misc.]
References in periodicals archive ?
Readers who are not already interested in antebellum bohemianism or Whitman may wish for the book to make a stronger argument for why Pfaff's biography and the story of his beer hall are important to American literary history.
Such a complex brew of contradictory value assessments were part of the allure of the scene; very often, the nexus of bohemianism develops at the site of ambiguity.
The Feminine Middlebrow Novel, 1920s to 1950s: Class, Domesticity and Bohemianism.
Very soon, as Sheila Fitzpatrick describes in The Cultural Front: Power and Culture in Revolutionary Russia, there began a widespread campaign against it: "In 192627 the party ran a propaganda campaign, aimed mainly at Komsomol members and students, against "decadence"--a pose of cynicism and political disillusionment modeled after the poet Sergei Esenin, bohemianism, and the alleged youth ideology of casual sex without responsibility.
As the movie The Social Network shows, their practical success is driven by networks of venture capital, a system that has little to do with bohemianism.
Matt Sandler analyzes Dunbar's relationship with George Horace Lorimer, the editor of the Saturday Evening Post, and the connections between Lorimer's rhetoric of self-help and that of racial uplift, as well as Dunbar's own interests in modernist aesthetics and bohemianism.
Rent's simultaneous resistance to and accommodation of bourgeois propriety is another instance in a considerable history of United States Americans' fascination with the cultural landscape of bohemianism, which is admirably surveyed in Joanna Levin's Bohemia in America, 1858-1920, an ambitious book that is both literary analysis and cultural criticism.
Former manager Stanley Bard famously let tenants pay their rent with artwork, and as a result, the Chelsea has become "one of the last outposts of artistic bohemianism," said building resident Ed Hamilton, a blogger and author of the book "Legends of the Chelsea Hotel.
But the economic forces to maintain the community were not there, and Toxteth slid into a mixture of bohemianism and despair.
Buffed up, then blended with a pinch of Moseley bohemianism.
For instance, in his conclusion, Hofstadter shows the anti-intellectualism of beatniks in particular and Bohemianism in general.
As Morrison observes, he had by his final years "consolidated the shift in his reputation from Romantic bohemian to Victorian man of letters," but the bohemianism evoked in Morrison's titular foregrounding of his subject's most enduring sobriquet provides the ground-bass of this biography.