Bohemianism


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Bohemianism

Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas, The
Gertrude Stein’s memoir of Paris’ Bohemia. [Am. Lit.: Stein The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas in Benét, 66]
Bloomsbury
section of London where, in the first half of the 20th century, a group of artists and intellectuals frequently congregated. [Br. Culture: Benét, 115]
Greenwich Village
area of southern Manhattan long identified with artists and writers. [Am. Culture: Misc.]
Haight-Ashbury
neighborhood in San Francisco associated with beatnicks and “flower people” in the 1960s. [Am. Culture: Misc.]
Latin Quarter
section of Paris on left bank of the Seine; home of students, artists, and writers. [Fr. Culture: EB, VI: 71–72]
Olenska, Countess Ellen
often considers divorce; likes “unacceptable” people. [Am. Lit.: The Age of Innocence]
SoHo
bohemian neighborhood So(uth of) Ho(uston Street), New York City. [Am. Culture: Misc.]
References in periodicals archive ?
Bohemianism begins in a real topography: the Rive Gauche of Paris that comes to be associated (accurately or not) with gypsies and other putative Central European immigrants and whose low rents were attractive to impoverished artists.
Former manager Stanley Bard famously let tenants pay their rent with artwork, and as a result, the Chelsea has become "one of the last outposts of artistic bohemianism," said building resident Ed Hamilton, a blogger and author of the book "Legends of the Chelsea Hotel.
But the economic forces to maintain the community were not there, and Toxteth slid into a mixture of bohemianism and despair.
Buffed up, then blended with a pinch of Moseley bohemianism.
Courtney commented towards the end of Odell's life that "his reminiscences would be valuable, for they embrace the whole period during which the change from Bohemianism has gradually occurred" (263-64).
As Morrison observes, he had by his final years "consolidated the shift in his reputation from Romantic bohemian to Victorian man of letters," but the bohemianism evoked in Morrison's titular foregrounding of his subject's most enduring sobriquet provides the ground-bass of this biography.
The logic of critiquing the Beats' Bohemianism is well established, perhaps most clearly articulated in Richard Hofstadter's classic study, Anti-Intellectualism in American Life:
The cult of spoiled bohemianism that has given [Ellis] his propers--the almost insolent daring, the excess even--has given way to a dull, stricken, under-medicated nonstory that goes nowhere.
during the 19th century, considering Bohemianism to be important only after it exploded in Greenwich Village in the 1910s.
Concentrating mainly on Synge's "best-known prose work, The Aran Islands," Burke's third chapter proposes that Revival antipathy towards British and bourgeois culture reinforced the tinker-making Synge's investment in two phenomena: the mythohistorical tradition that the Irish possess archaic Oriental roots; and the Continental European fascination with artistic, Gypsy-inflected bohemianism.
Desputin's drooping companion, propped up behind a glass of absinthe, represents women, many of them in Degas' very neighborhood, caught in ill-fitting bohemianism, absinthe not withstanding, for as Oscar Wilde put it, "After the first glass, you see things as you wish they were.
That suggestion has not entirely gone away, and if it ever comes to pass, the effect on the character of the area, with its prosperous bohemianism, could be dramatic.