Bolingbroke


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Related to Bolingbroke: Henry Bolingbroke

Bolingbroke

1. the surname of Henry IV of England
2. Henry St John, 1st Viscount Bolingbroke. 1678--1751, English politician; fled to France in 1714 and acted as secretary of state to the Old Pretender; returned to England in 1723. His writings include A Dissertation on Parties (1733--34) and Idea of a Patriot King (1738)
References in periodicals archive ?
When it cleared it was obvious the last remaining section of maisonette with scaffolding attached to it had collapsed and landed only a couple of feet short of Bolingbroke Heights and the main entrance to the building.
Bolingbroke, backed by an army of supporters, returns demanding his rightful inheritance.
Sold by the Bolingbroke family in 1943, it was bought by Walter Hutchinson before being sold again in 1951 when it made pounds 12,600 and entered the Woolavington Collection.
Unallured by Bolingbroke, it is doubtful that Pope, although a Catholic, would have been a Jacobite, or even a royalist at all.
Shakespeare begins his play with a dispute between Bolingbroke and the Duke of Norfolk.
The final chapter examines the play of Woodstock, and the author's support of the monarchy and his nostalgia for an eroding socioeconomic system, alongside John Hayward's Life and Raigne of Henrie IIII with its Tacitean perspective--promoting "history's didactic and memorial function" (291)--and Francis Bacon's Declaration, which draws parallels between the treason of Bolingbroke and that of Essex.
Holinshed reports that Bolingbroke had summoned Parliament "vsing the name of king Richard in the writs directed forth to the lords," (3) as Shakespeare's Henry has also done.
When Bolingbroke returns with an army to reclaim his inheritance and whatever else he can get - such as Richard's crown - the divine right of kings and the principle of orderly succession come under attack.
Fred Bolingbroke rides roller coasters for a living.
This certainly helps to explain exactly how Bolingbroke gets away with the various crimes he commits in the name of restoring "good government.
Richard feared that Bolingbroke would unmask the king's complicity in the murder of Bolingbroke's uncle, the Duke of Gloucester, a noble who was popular with the court.
Moreover, some of his comments seem rather strange or imprecise, at least from a legal perspective, for example, "Richard is wasting his tenement, so Bolingbroke seizes him"(5) and ".