bollard

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bollard

1. a strong wooden or metal post mounted on a wharf, quay, etc., used for securing mooring lines
2. Brit a small post or marker placed on a kerb or traffic island to make it conspicuous to motorists
3. Mountaineering an outcrop of rock or pillar of ice that may be used to belay a rope

Bollard

A low single post, or one of a series, usually made of stone or concrete, set upright in the pavement, closely spaced to prevent motor vehicles from entering an area.

bollard

[′bäl·ərd]
(civil engineering)
A heavy post on a dock or ship used in mooring ships.

bollard

A low single post, or one of a series, usually stone, set to prevent motor vehicles from entering an area.
References in periodicals archive ?
We're excited to have our LED bollard light featured because it exemplifies superior energy efficiency," said Access Fixtures CEO, Steven Rothschild.
A council spokesman said: "We have listened to the residents' views and have removed the bollards.
The authority decided to install the bollards after a report from the National Counter Terrorism Security Office (NaCTSO), said crowded places in city centres presented an "attractive target" to terrorists.
Market Cross company manager Dawn Welsh, above, said she had raised concerns about the bollards before the raid.
And the lads charge householders pounds 2 a bollard, hoping to help meet fees of up to pounds 9,000 a year.
Meanwhile, a local tour guide and city centre businessman Martin McCrossan has described the installation of the bollards as a backward step.
Internal house-side shields in the bollards reinforce the memorial boundary and minimize spill light onto the lawn areas.
The bollards rise at 10am each weekday to block traffic in the day time, but they go down at 6pm.
HOLYROOD chiefs have been left red-faced by a set of misfiring bollards at the heart of their pounds 1.
Two very unusual bollards have appeared on the streets of Birmingham for the very first time in an effort to slow traffic and make motorists more aware of the dangers, particularly close to school gates.
Edward Goddard, 41, of Llanmartin, Newport, South Wales, was angry at being called out late to pick up his stepdaughter and her friends and pretended to drive at bollards at speeds of up to 110mph.