Bolton

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Bolton

or

Bolton-le-Moors

(bōl`tən-lə-mo͝orz), metropolitan borough (1991 pop. 143,960), NW England, located in the Manchester metropolitan area. Since the late 18th cent., when spinning factories were built and a canal (1791) was constructed to Manchester, Bolton has been a cotton-textile center. Prior to that time, wool weaving, which was stimulated by the immigration of Flemings in the 14th cent., was important. Besides the textile plants (sheets, quilts, towels, bedcovers, and dress materials), factories pack poultry and produce textile and other machinery, chemicals, leather goods, furniture, carpets, and paper. Samuel CromptonCrompton, Samuel,
1753–1827, English inventor of the mule spinner, or muslin wheel, an important step in the development of fine cotton spinning. Working as a young man in a spinning mill, he knew the defects of the Hargreaves jenny and determined to produce something
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, inventor of the spinning mule (1779), was born nearby and is buried in Bolton. Richard ArkwrightArkwright, Sir Richard,
1732–92, English inventor. His construction of a machine for spinning, the water frame, patented in 1769, was an early step in the Industrial Revolution.
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 invented the "water frame" there c.1768.

Bolton

 

(Bolton-le-Moors), a city and county borough in Great Britain in Lancashire County. Population, 152,500 (1969). Bolton is a part of the Manchester conurbation and a railroad junction. It is one of the oldest (14th century) centers of the textile industry. Its principal industries are cotton manufacturing and the production of automobile and airplane parts. Bolton also has metallurgical, electronics, paper, chemicals, and garment industries.

bolton

one who flatters by pretending humility. [Br. Hist.: Espy, 343]

Bolton

1. a town in NW England, in Bolton unitary authority, Greater Manchester: centre of the woollen trade since the 14th century; later important for cotton. Pop.: 139 403 (2001)
2. a unitary authority in NW England, in Greater Manchester. Pop.: 263 800 (2003 est.). Area: 140 sq. km (54 sq. miles)
References in periodicals archive ?
Bolton retired in 1940 but was brought back to the university during World War II.
During his four decades on the Berkeley campus, Bolton chaired the history department, ran the Bancroft Library, and trained hundreds of graduate students, some of whom became prominent historians in their own right.
When I decided to write a book about Bolton in 1987, one of the first claims that I heard about him was that he was anti-Semitic.
9) Perhaps Bolton, who wrote favorably about Catholic history in America, shared these pernicious views.
Bolton's student in the 1930s, was kept out of the history department by Bolton because he was a Jew.
But in his youth Bolton was not a crusader against prejudice.
Though Bolton evidently believed that Jews possessed distinctive physical characteristics, he did not believe that they should be barred from graduate school or academic employment.
Marshall's vicious comments foreshadowed the difficulty that Bolton would have in placing Nasatir.
So by the 1920s it would appear that Bolton supported the recruitment, training, and placement of Jews in the academy.
Despite his relationship with Ehrman and support for Jewish students, Bolton chaired a history department that had never hired a Jewish professor.
In addition, the John Bolton PAC and SuperPAC have made contributions of more than $470,000 to candidates who demonstrated commitment to promoting strong national security policy.
Given the increasingly destabilizing global factors America faces today, this upcoming election will be vitally important towards selecting individuals that possess the strategic will necessary to project American strength to both our closest allies and adversaries," Bolton said.