bumblebee

(redirected from Bombus)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Wikipedia.
Related to Bombus: Bombus vosnesenskii

bumblebee:

see beebee,
name for flying insects of the superfamily Apoidea, in the same order as the ants and the wasps. Bees are characterized by their enlarged hind feet, typically equipped with pollen baskets of stiff hairs for gathering pollen.
..... Click the link for more information.
.

bumblebee

[′bəm·bəl‚bē]
(invertebrate zoology)
The common name for several large, hairy social bees of the genus Bombus in the family Apidae.

bumblebee

, humblebee
any large hairy social bee of the genus Bombus and related genera, of temperate regions: family Apidae
References in periodicals archive ?
Evidence for decline in eastern North American bumblebees (Hymenoptera: Apidae), with special focus on Bombus affinis Cresson.
Strange has been researching a possible solution: a pretty, orange-striped bee named Bombus huntii.
In an e-mail to a bombus list-serv in 1998, Adrian Van Doorn, then head of the pollination department at Koppert Biological Systems, a commercial breeder, noted that they had been rearing B.
Strange has been studying a pretty, orange-striped generalist named Bombus huntii, native to the western half of the country that could be used in greenhouses in the western United States.
The Bombus genus is unusual among British bumble-bees,because some of its queens, workers and drones are entirely black -the type known as Bombus Harrisellus, which has also been sighted at the farm.
normanii, both pollinated specifically by males of Bombus (Psithyrus) vestalis (Paulus & Gack, 1995; Gogler et al.
Scientists from Queen Mary, University of London have found that while most bees are hibernating, the buff-tailed bumblebee, Bombus terrestris, is out taking advantage of exotic winter-flowering plants in the gardens and parks.
Bombus is the Latin name for which family of insects?
There had been 14,000 recordings of bumblebees before Valentine's Day - one species, Bombus terrestris, has been spotted by Springwatchers producing an extra generation in winter.
Bosch and Kemp are comparing the pollen booty collected by several different bee species--including the domesticated Apis mellifera honey bee and the big and furry Western bumblebee, Bombus occidentalis.
2010) reported that EF1-[alpha] was stably expressed in different life stages of Bombus terrestris (L.