Bona Dea


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Bona Dea

(bō`nə dē`ə), in Roman religion, ancient fertility goddess worshiped only by women; also called Fauna. She was said to be the daughter, sister, or wife of FaunusFaunus
, in Roman religion, woodland deity, protector of herds and crops. He was identified with the Greek Pan. His festival was observed on Dec. 5 with dancing and merrymaking.
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. No man could be present at her annual festival in May.

Bona Dea

goddess; so chaste no one but husband sees her after marriage. [Rom. Myth.: Zimmerman, 43]

Bona Dea

“goddess of earthly creatures.” [Rom. Myth.: Parrinder, 48]
See: Earth

Bona Dea

goddess of fertility; counterpart of Faunus. [Rom. Myth.: Zimmerman, 43]
References in periodicals archive ?
In 62 BC Pompeia hosted the festival of the Bona Dea, which no man was permitted to attend.
En la Bona Dea romana se esconde la Coatlicue mexicana y, en un instante, Parvati se convierte en Durga: toda Diosa es al mismo tiempo cuerpo del mundo, casa de la muerte.
Chapter 5, "Religious Activities of Gentile Women and God-Fearers," includes an in-depth examination of the Vestal virgins and the Bona Dea cult, which was for women only.
In 62 BC she hosted the festival of the Bona Dea (' good goddess'), to which no man was permitted to attend.
A case in point is the worship of Bona Dea ("the Good Goddess").
Saint Cecilia in Trastevere is near the site of a late-antique shrine to the Roman goddess Bona Dea, a proto-feminist healer whose cult Connolly thinks was absorbed into that of the saint.
In both sections Connolly advances the novel argument that Cecilia came into being, as it were, out of the pagan cult of the Bona Dea oclata, the Good Goddess with the Eye, whose ancient shrine near what became the titular church of S.
For instance, in her treatment of the Bona Dea scandal, which in her account of the lost generation represents the entree of Curio (and the others to whom Cicero refers with his shorthand expression barbatuli iuvenes), she confuses the unsuccessful rogatio Pupia Valeria with the Lex Fufia, the measure which actually established the tribunal to try Clodius (cf.
Cicero had disproved Clodius's alibi when the latter was accused of profaning the rites of the Bona Dea by attending them in disguise, and, though through bribery Clodius was acquitted, he hated Cicero and harassed him from then on.
Brouwer's excellent study of the Bona Dea (The Bona Dea: The Sources and a Description of the Cult, Leiden: E.