Bonampak


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

Bonampak

(bōnämpäk`), ruined city of the Late Classic period of the MayaMaya
, indigenous people of S Mexico and Central America, occupying an area comprising the Yucatán peninsula and much of the present state of Chiapas in Mexico, Guatemala, Belize, parts of El Salvador, and extreme western Honduras.
..... Click the link for more information.
, close to TuxtlaTuxtla Gutiérrez
or Tuxtla,
city (1990 pop. 289,626), capital of Chiapas state, SE Mexico, in the fertile Grijalva valley and at the foot of the Chiapas highlands. Agriculture and cattle raising are the chief occupations, and there is trade in timber.
..... Click the link for more information.
, in Chiapas, S Mexico. Discovered in 1946, it consists of a group of temples, one of which is remarkable for a number of very well preserved frescoes, painted in bright, flat colors, depicting in considerable detail scenes of Maya life.
References in periodicals archive ?
Destilados Bonampak transforms this sugarcane into a Cuban-style rum-their master blender worked for several years with a large Cuban rum brand-and is housed in a bottle based off a tsantsa, the shrunken head of an enemy kept as a trophy.
In its effect, the finished room was equivalent to the plastered surfaces of the Bonampak mural chamber or a palace wall at Tikal, but construction favoured locally available bajo mud, a less labour-intensive material than lime plaster.
Discovered by the outside world in 1946, the Bonampak murals eviscerated scholars' long-held belief in an ancient Maya Empire ruled by kindly astronomer-priests.
La asignacion de una plantilla basica de 5 personas (incluyendo al director del ANP) y de presupuesto basico operativo para la Reserva de la Biosfera Lacan-Tun (en 1998), el monumento natural Bonampak (en 1999), y las areas de proteccion de flora y fauna Naha y Metzabok (en el 2000), lo que marco el inicio de la accion institucional para el manejo de dichas ANPs.
The lobster man of the Bonampak murals has already been suggested, and given Burroughs's preoccupation with crustaceans and insects he could easily extend the Bonampak lobster man to crab men and centipede men.
The Yaxchilan lintels, Bonampak murals, Jaina figurines and many of the very same painted cylindrical vessels, all considered by most to be so-called masterpieces of ancient Maya art, were highlighted in that catalog/show as well.
The Bonampak murals in Mexico, discovered in 1946, were painted about 790 AD, not long before the 900 AD collapse of the Mayan civilization.
A development in the state of Chiapas that comprises the archeological sites of Palenque, Bonampak and Yaxchilan, and the natural areas of Agua Azul and Playas de Catazajan.
But the tourists who come here by the thousands to see the nearby Mayan ruins of Palenque, Bonampak and Yaxchilan have fled.
In the state of Chiapas, Mexico, the "Temple of the Paintings," Bonampak, was, until its discovery in 1946, safe from environmental degradations.
After a trip to the jungles of southern Mexico in 1945, Bourne, along with another explorer and photographer, became the first non-Maya to see the ruins of Bonampak, the now famous Mayan site celebrated for its royal building whose interior walls are covered with historically and politically significant murals.
The Bonampak Murals that depict the presentation of a new heir to the throne, the hieroglyphics used to represent Mayan months and the different masks worn by the rain god Tlaloc in Mixteco, Zapoteco and Mexica styles can be found in the company's ties and scarves.