Bone Tools


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Bone Tools

 

various tools made of the bones, antlers, and tusks of animals. They are known from the Paleolithic period. In the Upper Paleolithic, spearheads, dart tips, needles, chisels, awls, and daggers were made from bone; in the Neolithic, bone also came to be used for arrowheads, harpoons, fishhooks, hoes, parts of bows, and planes (tools for cleaning hides). Bone tools were also widely used in the early Iron Age, for example, among tribes of the D’iakovo culture. With the development of metal-working, bone tools were gradually replaced by metal tools. Among some peoples, especially the land and sea hunters of the North (Eskimo, Chukchi, Koriak), the use of bone tools continued until the 17th through 19th centuries.

References in periodicals archive ?
Prehistoric antler- and bone tools from Kaposuljak-Vardomb (south-western Hungary) with special regard to the Early Bronze Age implements.
You can walk through the tunnels, and a highlight is the amazing Bronze Age cavern which was dug out more than 3,500 years ago by miners using nothing more than stone and bone tools.
The Clovis left behind stone and bone tools all over the continent, but no trace of where they came from.
21 ( ANI ): Researchers have suggested that it may have been Neandertals, and not modern humans, who made first specialized bone tools in Europe.
The aim of this paper is to document the type of macrofractures and the frequencies in which they occur in a sample of bone points of known function in an effort to further test the reliability of the method on bone tools.
The shells were found to contain ancient flakes of charcoal and dried-out red pigment, and pigment was also detected on bone tools in this ancient "artist's studio.
of Leiden and Groningen) is particularly interested in the microscopic study of stone and bone tools, and has written widely about microwear analysis.
Using sharpened stone and bone tools they created their stories in stone.
Visitors can walk through the cavernous tunnels which connect the mines, and the highlight of the tour is undoubtedly the Bronze Age Cavern, which was dug out more than 3,500 years ago by miners using nothing more than stone and bone tools.
Bone tools have been produced by Australian Aborigines for at least 22 000 years.
Only two years ago in March, 2002, cavers were thrilled to discovered a Bronze Age chamber containing 30 animal bone tools and over a dozen stone hammers untouched by human hand for millennia.
I didn't go as far as using stone and bone tools, instead I opted for modern steel hoes, rakes and shovels.