mineralization

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mineralization

[‚min·rə·lə′zā·shən]
(geology)
The process of fossilization whereby inorganic materials replace the organic constituents of an organism.
The introduction of minerals into a rock, resulting in a mineral deposit.
References in periodicals archive ?
Studies have shown that improved physical activity combined with proper nutrition may help to promote bone mineralization not only in infants17 but also in elderly people and is associated with long term beneficial skeletal effects that could possibly reduce fracture risk.
While the mechanisms, by which subchondral bone mineralization is reduced in late OA may be related to osteoblast differentiation factors.
As documented complications of SCI, reduction in bone mineralization and deterioration of skeletal microarchitecture occur predominantly in long bones of lower limbs [3,4].
According to the company, HPP is characterised by low alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and defective bone mineralization that can lead to deformity of bones and other skeletal abnormalities as well as systemic complications such as profound muscle weakness, seizures, pain, and respiratory failure leading to premature death in infants.
In particular, the researchers noted that the sport's constant action and unorthodox movements increased bone mineralization in the femur (thigh) bone and femoral neck (which attaches the femur to the femoral head, or "ball" that connects to the hip socket).
The bone mineralization surfaces around SPAEK-COL-SIL samples were farther placed signifying more bone deposition in the 3-4 weeks time.
Vitamin D has received significant research attention over the past decade and is known to play a critical role in calcium and phosphorus homeostasis, bone mineralization, and skeletal growth.
The effect of the viral infection per se and/ or that of ART exposure on bone mineralization represent critical areas for research.
Powdered eggshells have been used for bone mineralization and growth.
Screening for vitamin D deficiency is imperative for the adolescent age group who have been identified to have risk factors because the deficiency can compound other illnesses, prevents appropriate bone mineralization, and decreases the patient's generalized sense of well-being.

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