Bone Tools

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Bone Tools

 

various tools made of the bones, antlers, and tusks of animals. They are known from the Paleolithic period. In the Upper Paleolithic, spearheads, dart tips, needles, chisels, awls, and daggers were made from bone; in the Neolithic, bone also came to be used for arrowheads, harpoons, fishhooks, hoes, parts of bows, and planes (tools for cleaning hides). Bone tools were also widely used in the early Iron Age, for example, among tribes of the D’iakovo culture. With the development of metal-working, bone tools were gradually replaced by metal tools. Among some peoples, especially the land and sea hunters of the North (Eskimo, Chukchi, Koriak), the use of bone tools continued until the 17th through 19th centuries.

References in periodicals archive ?
He is also the co-author of most of the other chapters dealing with spatial distribution and discard patterns, the basaltic artefacts, bone tool industry, and artefacts and manuports of various materials.
The bone fragment, from a French archaeological site, turned out to be a part of an early specialized bone tool used by a Neandertal before the first modern humans appeared in Europe.
James Bran non is a board certified, practicing orthopedic surgeon who has invented three patented, FDA approved devices that help treat patients with musculoskeletal conditions: the Bone Tool, the Hip Tool, and the OT-A.
These objects included a tooth that had been stained and abraded, a bone tool that had been whittled with a steel knife and a orang-utan jawbone that had been broken and abraded.
The find at Blombos Cave, in a cliff overlooking the Indian Ocean at the extreme tip of South Africa, is the first clear evidence of a Middle Stone Age bone tool industry.
The bone tool is still used today by leather workers some fifty thousand years after the Neanderthals and the first anatomically modern humans in Europe.
Although simple ad hoc tools are represented among them, a certain standardization of selected material and shape is characteristic of many bone tool types in the period under discussion.
However, whereas bone tool studies have only described the type of fracture, such as chipped, dulled, split (Tyzzer 1936), transverse, jagged (Pokines 1998), bevelled, rounded or crushed (Arndt & Newcomer 1986), the macrofracture method, as applied to stone tool studies, focuses specifically on the termination of such fractures.
A large (195 x 44 x 14mm) spatula-like bone tool was found in EUP layer 1C.
Keywords: Ukraine, Middle Palaeolithic, equid, bone tool
She also detected a probable bone tool from the nearby Sterkfontein site.