Bononcini


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Bononcini

(bōnōnchē`nē) or

Buononcini

(bwō–), musical family of Modena, Italy. Giovanni Maria Bononcini, 1642–78, choirmaster and organist at Bologna and Modena, was a composer and the author of Musico prattico (1673). His son Giovanni Bononcini, 1670–1747, was a composer, chiefly of operas. In London he was the associate and later the rival of Handel. The opera Muzio Scevola (London, 1721) was a pasticcio by Bononcini, Filippo Mattei, and Handel. His opera Camilla (London, 1706), often erroneously attributed to Antonio Mira, helped begin the English fashion for Italian opera. After failing in his operatic ventures Bononcini, charged with plagiarism, left England and spent the rest of his life in obscure wanderings. He composed operas, produced in Venice, from 1748. Another son, Antonio Maria Bononcini, 1677–1726, became musical director to the duke of Modena in 1721. He wrote many operas, most of which were produced in Venice.
References in periodicals archive ?
19) By 1719, the year Bononcini moved to London as an associate of Handel's (though the two later became arch-rivals), Leveridge would have been familiar with many of his works and he is known to have set words to some of Bononcini's instrumental pieces.
The Daily Journal announced 'printed by subscription in a neat Pocket Volume, the most curious collection of the very best Songs out of all the Operas composed by Mr Hendell [sic], Signor Bononcini, Attelio'.
The last piece before intermission was an aria from "Fuori del ma capanna," according to the program notes by Bononcini, although the actual composer seems to be a matter of conjecture among scholars.
The bibliographic record of Cantate da camera, a voce sola Libro secondo by Giovanni Maria Bononcini (1642-1678) published at Bologna in 1678 represents a good example of a printed anthology.
But this was no mere beanfeast for canary-fanciers, as there was much to enthral the historian, too, such as one of Bartoli's four encores showing us that Bononcini anticipated Handel's Largo by four decades.
Some, like tunes from The Bird Fancyer's Delight by an anonymous composer, and Francois Couperin's Le Rossignol en Amour, imitate the sounds of nature; others, including cantatas by Bononcini, Handel and William Croft, whose Celladon gives the CD its title, reflect on the joys and sorrows of rustic love.
Steffani's career and compositions warrant serious consideration, not least because his music influenced Handel as well as Giovanni Bononcini, Mattheson, Telemann, J.
5 Corelli 1700 Walsh a (engraved flat and bass clef) Harmonia Lenis Bishop 1700 unidentified Set of Ayres Simons 1701 Walsh a (engraved bass clef) Lessons for a Single Flute Demoivre 1701 Walsh a (no bass clef evident) Six Sonatas or Solos Topham 1701 Walsh a (engraved bass clef) Ayres in Three Parts Bononcini 1701 Walsh a (engraved bass clef) Sonatas, op.
As it did on the first album, the Ensemble Buon Tempo presents its program in roughly chronological order, moving from sixteenth- and seventeenth-century compositions of John Playford, Pierre Attaingnant, and Jean d'Estree through the eighteenth century with pieces by Raoul-Auger Feuillet, Louis Pecour, Jean-Baptiste Lully, Giovanni Battista Bononcini, D'Aubat St.
Newly available sonatas by members of the Bononcini family should also find a place in the performer's repertory.
When discussing Camilla (1706), for example, he wrongly dates the premiere (30 April rather than 30 March), attributes it to the wrong Bononcini (Antonio rather than Giovanni, who is named on all extant scores and libretti) and refers once again (cf.
The manuscript is copied by an unknown hand and includes works by Giovanni Maria Bononcini, Arcangelo Corelli, and Nicola Matteis, besides some unattributed pieces; one of which, numbered "XIII," follows the twelve printed sonatas in the two violin and bassus volumes, though it is unlikely to be by the same composer.