Osteichthyes

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Related to Bony fishes: Cartilaginous fishes

Osteichthyes

[‚ä·stē′ik·thē‚ēz]
(vertebrate zoology)
The bony fishes, a class of fishlike vertebrates distinguished by having a bony skeleton, a swim bladder, a true gill cover, and mesodermal ganoid, cycloid, or ctenoid scales.
References in periodicals archive ?
A total of 33 taxa were caught during this study, specifically 11 species of sharks (2 species belonging to Mobulidae), 6 species of billfish, 3 species of tuna, 12 species of other bony fishes and a single species of marine turtle (Table 1).
The rRNA genes showed a slightly lower A+T contents comparing with the protein-coding genes and tRNA genes (Supplementary Table S2), however, slightly richer than other bony fishes (Kim et al.
127] Sparus aurata Duguay et al, [44] Dentex dentex Bermejo-Nogales et al, [17] Cirrhinus molitorella Zhang et al, [198] Cottus kazika Inoue et al, [63] Acipenser baerii Hu et al, [61] Paralichthys adspersus Fuentes et al, [51] Spinibarbus sinensis Huang et al, [60] Procypris rabaudi Li et al, [81] Mugil cephalus Nocillado et al, [119] Megalobrama amblycephala Bai et al, [9] Micropterus salmoides Li et al, [83] Myxocyprinus asiaticus Zheng et al, [198] Table 2: Tajima's Neutrality Test for IGF-I amino acid sequence in 30 taxa of bony fishes.
Great white sharks feed on a wide variety of prey, including bony fishes, elasmobranchs, marine mammals, molluscs, crustaceans, sea turtles and birds.
1977) established a vascular model for bony fishes, without detailing the ramification and distribution of the arteries, unlike that reported by Danforth (1912) and the one found in the present study of piracuru.
Biology This species feeds on small crustaceans, cephalopods, bony fishes, and jellyfish (Compagno, 2002a).
Bony fishes were represented by a ceratohyal element of Pachyrhizodus caninus and bone fragments of Bananogmius cf.
The most commonly occurring fossils within this unit are bony fishes, consisting of numerous isolated scales and teeth, as well as toothplates of pycnodont and albulid fishes.
Other groups that were frequently consumed included gastropods (46%), bryozoans (45%), echinoderms (33%), and bony fishes (32%); however, these species contributed little by weight.
Although sharks and bony fishes are not closely related, they are nonetheless both fish while mammals have very different anatomies and physiologies.
This may be of fundamental importance to deep-sea adaptation, because analyses of deep-sea bony fishes have revealed that TMAO contents increase with depth (16), (17), resulting in an increase in internal osmotic pressure.