Osteichthyes

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Related to Bony fishes: Cartilaginous fishes

Osteichthyes

[‚ä·stē′ik·thē‚ēz]
(vertebrate zoology)
The bony fishes, a class of fishlike vertebrates distinguished by having a bony skeleton, a swim bladder, a true gill cover, and mesodermal ganoid, cycloid, or ctenoid scales.
References in periodicals archive ?
Values of mean percent weight and mean percent number predictably showed bony fishes to be the dominant prey consumed (44% and 35%, respectively); however, decapod crustaceans (32%) and nondecapod crustaceans (29%) had similarly high values for mean percent number (Fig.
Values of composition by weight were comparable for bony fishes, decapods crustaceans, and polychaetes (21%, 22%, and 29%, respectively).
127] Sparus aurata Duguay et al, [44] Dentex dentex Bermejo-Nogales et al, [17] Cirrhinus molitorella Zhang et al, [198] Cottus kazika Inoue et al, [63] Acipenser baerii Hu et al, [61] Paralichthys adspersus Fuentes et al, [51] Spinibarbus sinensis Huang et al, [60] Procypris rabaudi Li et al, [81] Mugil cephalus Nocillado et al, [119] Megalobrama amblycephala Bai et al, [9] Micropterus salmoides Li et al, [83] Myxocyprinus asiaticus Zheng et al, [198] Table 2: Tajima's Neutrality Test for IGF-I amino acid sequence in 30 taxa of bony fishes.
Biology The Greenland shark feeds on bony fishes (e.
Biology The kitefin shark is a versatile deep-sea predator that feeds on numerous bony fishes, rays, crabs, and squid.
Bony fishes were represented by a ceratohyal element of Pachyrhizodus caninus and bone fragments of Bananogmius cf.
The bony fishes (teleosts) of the Tuscahoma and Bashi formations, early Eocene, Meridian, Lauderdale County, Mississippi.
The most commonly occurring fossils within this unit are bony fishes, consisting of numerous isolated scales and teeth, as well as toothplates of pycnodont and albulid fishes.
In the last decade, paddlefish have become a useful benchmark in evolutionary studies because their position on the evolutionary tree makes them a reasonably good proxy for the ancestor of the bony fishes that evolved into tetrapods such as humans.
New research on Acanthodes bronni, a fish from the Paleozoic era, sheds light on the evolution of the earliest jawed vertebrates and offers a new glimpse of the last common ancestor before the split between the earliest sharks and the first bony fishes - the lineage that would eventually include human beings.
Unexpectedly, Acanthodes turns out to be the best view we have of conditions in the last common ancestor of bony fishes and sharks," said Michael Coates, PhD, professor of organismal biology and anatomy at the University of Chicago and senior author of the study.
There are approximately 50,000 species of jawed vertebrates, such as humans and bony fishes, living today.