Book of Common Prayer


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Book of Common Prayer,

title given to the service book used in the Church of England and in other churches of the Anglican Communion. The first complete English Book of Common Prayer was produced, mainly by Thomas Cranmer, in 1549 under Edward VI. Essentially it was a selection and translation from the breviary and the missal, with some additions from other sources. It was made compulsory by the Act of Uniformity (1549). Revision, undertaken by Cranmer, resulted in the Prayer Book of 1552, which showed the influence of foreign reformers then resident in England, for it made possible a wide diversity of views regarding the Eucharist, all justified by this official service book. The prayer book was in use only about eight months before Queen Mary's repeal legislation restored Roman Catholicism in England. In 1559, under Elizabeth I, the Prayer Book of 1552 was restored in a slightly altered version. From 1645 to 1660, under the Commonwealth and Protectorate, the prayer book was suppressed. In a new revision after the Restoration, it was again declared the only legal service book for use in England by an Act of Uniformity (1662). Alterations in the 1662 revision were largely those making for liturgical improvement. In 1927 a revised form was submitted to Parliament, whose approval was (and is) still required, and passed by the House of Lords but rejected by the Commons; it was resubmitted (with certain modifications) in 1928 and again rejected. Nonetheless, the revised prayer book was quite widely adopted in the Church of England with episcopal approval. This situation was finally legalized by the Prayer Book Measure, passed by Parliament in 1965. In addition to authorizing revisions already in use, the act approved the experimental use of new forms of worship drawn up by a liturgical commission; the Alternative Service Book (ASB) was adopted in 1980 and authorized for use alongside the Book of Common Prayer until the end of 2000. Revision of ASB is underway and under the general title Common Worship some revisions have already been authorized and published. In 1789, when the first General Convention of the Episcopal Church in the United States met, a revised version of the Book of Common Prayer was adopted; it embodied such changes as were required by the new conditions. In the U.S. Episcopal Church, as in other churches of the Anglican Communion over which the British Parliament has no control, there has been greater freedom in liturgical revision; the last U.S. revision of the Book of Common Prayer was in 1979.

Bibliography

See histories of the prayer book by J. H. Blunt (1868) and F. E. Brightman (2d ed. 1921, repr. 1970); J. W. Suter and G. J. Cleaveland, The American Book of Common Prayer (1949); M. H. Shepherd, The Oxford American Prayer Book Commentary (1950); G. Cuming, A History of Anglican Liturgy (1969, repr. 1980); B. Cummings, ed., The Book of Common Prayer (2011); D. Swift, Shakespeare's Common Prayers (2012); A. Jacobs, The Book of Common Prayer (2013).


Prayer, Book of Common:

see Book of Common PrayerBook of Common Prayer,
title given to the service book used in the Church of England and in other churches of the Anglican Communion. The first complete English Book of Common Prayer was produced, mainly by Thomas Cranmer, in 1549 under Edward VI.
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References in periodicals archive ?
In both he takes hearty swipes at the use of set prayers in The Book of Common Prayer, including even the Lord's Prayer.
Indeed, he admits that many of them were members (some active) of other protestant denominations that had never held a Book of Common Prayer in their hands, but were keen to resist the specter of a "despotic papacy" undermining the "liberties" of the nation, and responded to the call to vote down medieval relapses by means of the anachronistic liturgical authority of parliament of which they were members.
And the ground of the Church of England is its precious Book of Common Prayer.
The Bibliography of the Book of Common Prayer is the result of many years of extensive and painstaking research.
evensong at Hudders-eld Parish Church uses the words of the 1662 Book of Common Prayer and the church choir sings most Sunday afternoons but guest choirs are invited on occasion.
When is the Anglican Church of Canada going to join the other churches in the Anglican Communion and introduce our own new Book of Common Prayer (BCP)?
The volume presents, successively rather than in parallel columns, the 1549, 1559, and 1662 editions of the Book of Common Prayer of the Church of England, freshly revised from original texts.
The Flower Festival - which includes more than 20 displays - is to celebrate the 350th anniversary of the 1662 Book of Common Prayer.
THE 1662 Book of Common Prayer (BCP) is 350 years old this year.
NATIONAL HEROES'' (UGANDA) 1549: The Church of England adopted The Book of Common Prayer compiled by Thomas Cranmer.
She begins by tracing the rite from its antecedents and origin through the Middle Ages and the Cranmerian influences in the Anglican tradition, to the Book of Common Prayer in 1979.
The Prayer Book Society promotes the 1662 Book of Common Prayer, which is the basis of the Anglican faith around the world.