Exodus

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Related to Book of Exodus: Book of Genesis, Moses

Exodus

(ĕk`sədəs), book of the Bible, 2d of the 5 books of the Law (the Pentateuch or Torah) ascribed by tradition to Moses. The book continues the story of the ancestors of Israel in Egypt, now grown in number to a large landless population enslaved by the pharaoh. Although the book describes all 12 tribes, it is much more likely that the book is based on the traditions of a group of nomadic Hebrews whose sojourn in Egypt became one of oppression and slavery. Grouped around Moses, they were freed from bondage at the Red Sea. Their saga and their Mosaic religion became the determinative feature of the great national epic that is enshrined in the Pentateuch and the historical books of the Hebrew Bible. The religious and 12-tribe political establishment of the later Temple period is read back into the Exodus narrative. The events of the book may be outlined as follows: first, the bondage in Egypt, from which God prepares liberation through the agency of Moses, including Moses' early career and vocation, and the first nine plagues of Egypt; second, the exodus proper, with the plague of the first-born and the institution of the Passover and the dry crossing through the Red Sea; third, the first divine legislation at Mt. Sinai. The last portion includes the Ten Commandments, a law code, directions for a tabernacle and worship, the designation of Aaron as high priest, the first national apostasy in worshiping the golden calf, a brief restatement of the code, and the institution of the tabernacle.

Bibliography

See studies by N. M. Sarna (1986), J. Durham (1987), and T. E. Fretheim (1991).

Exodus

Jewish captives escape Pharaoh’s bondage. [O.T.: Exodus]
See: Escape

Exodus

departure of Israelites from Egypt under Moses. [O.T.: Exodus]
See: Journey

Exodus

1. the. the departure of the Israelites from Egypt led by Moses
2. the second book of the Old Testament, recounting the events connected with this and the divine visitation of Moses at Mount Sinai

EXODUS

(database)
An extensible database project developed at the University of Wisconsin.

eXodus

(2)
A package from White Pines allowing the Macintosh to be used as an X server.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is also surprising that the Sabbath isn't alluded to in Deuteronomy outside the Decalogue, as it is in the Book of Exodus (Exodus 31:12-18, 35:2-3).
For example, Umberto Cassuto (A Commentary on the Book of Exodus [Jerusalem: Magnes Press, 1967], 327, 453) writes that the Israelites would have been able to purchase the needed materials from caravans that passed near them in the wilderness, and he noted that the text in Exodus followed the literary style of the ancient East.
One Soldier with a theological education is leading a study on the book of Exodus.
Based loosely on the Biblical book of Exodus, Holly Hannon's splendid illustrations perfectly showcase Sylvia Rouss The Littlest Frog and is a picturebook specifically meant for young ones ages 3-6.
The book of Exodus frequently gives us indications of what this time of vigil was like: "The people grumbled against Moses, 'We are disgusted with this wretched food .
In the book of Exodus (20:7), God tells the Israelites that "Thou shalt not take the name of the Lord thy God in vain; for the Lord shall not hold him guiltless that taketh his name in vain.
Elizabeth, a member of the First Baptist Church in Broomfield, likes the Bible, so opted to share the book of Exodus with her class.
The Book of Exodus is the background that presents Moses as the adopted child who rose in defence of his people, became a hero on the run and wrestled with his call to serve God and his people.
one of the Pharaonic plagues described in the biblical book of Exodus, occurring around 1491 BC, and an epidemic in seventeenth century Europe [15]), but evidence is weak.
The fact that almost the entire Book of Exodus is dedicated to the most intricate and detailed descriptions of the building, contents, materials, assemblage, and even timing of the assemblage of the Mishkan along this journey, indicates an enduring importance to the People of Israel that is significant beyond its literal physical attributes.
A wonderful chapter shows how the well-known Biblical confrontation of Moses and Pharaoh in the Book of Exodus is transformed into vibrant poetry by Dunbar and Johnson.