Book of the Courtier


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Book of the Courtier

Castiglione’s discussion of the manners of the perfect courtier (1528). [Ital. Lit.: EB, II: 622]
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The Book of the Courtier, or Il Cortigiano, by Baldassare Castiglione, which has the famous scene toward the end that Shakespeare stole for his last scene of The Merchant of Venice.
Drawing on both Machiavelli's The Prince and Castiglione's The Book of the Courtier, Balthazar presents an informally written book designed to guide the beginning political staffer.
Discussion of the Renaissance starts with the cinquecento, moving from celebrated manuals of manners and mores such as Baldassare Castiglione's The Book of the Courtier (1528) and Giovanni della Casa's Galateo (1558) to the splendour of the Elizabethan court, where the Queen's beauty hid a literally deadly secret: in those days the most widely used cosmetic was the highly poisonous Venetian ceruse, made by exposing lead plates to the vapours of vinegar.
If The Book of the Courtier, the etiquette guide penned by the sixteenth-century Italian diplomat Baldassare Castiglione, is known at all today, it's probably for its coinage of sprezzatura, a word it uses to describe a very particular, and very practiced, mode of nonchalance.
Castiglione's The Book of the Courtier (Il Libro del Cortegiano): A Classic in the Making.
76) In The Book of the Courtier, Federico Fregoso is made to remark, "so it seems to me that the most agreeable colour is black," and further, "I should like the clothes our courtier wears to reflect the sobriety characteristic of the Spaniards" (Castiglione, 135).
This new use of the studia humanitatis, drawing on the classical tradition and on Cicero in particular, was significantly mediated for Renaissance England by Castiglione's Book of the Courtier.
She also examines two mid-sixteenth century portrait treatises, by Francisco de Hollanda and Gabriele Paleotti, that deal with these issues explicitly and at length, as well as instructional books of manners for a general audience, such as Baldassare Castiglione's Book of the Courtier.
Similar detailed and specific rejoinders are made throughout the book--to Jonathan Dollimore's contention, for example, that in The Book of the Courtier, Castiglione "takes up and develops the idea of 'the protean self, artificially constructed' and with no fixed nature or commitment to anything" (but vide Castiglione himself: "it is meete eche man know him selfe, and his own disposition, and apply him selfe thereto .
a comparison between Castiglione's Book of the courtier and the La cortigiana, the presentation of Cortigiana as a virtual tribute to Pasquino and his pasquinate, an analysis of how Aretinos comedy is a mirror of Leo x's papal court, and a bibliography of primary and secondary-sources.
The second new title is Daniel Javitch's edition of The Book of the Courtier by Baldesar Castiglione ([pounds sterling]10.
In The Book of the Courtier, Baldassar Castiglione reported a series of conversations which were supposed to have taken place at the court of Guidobaldo da Montefeltro Duke of Urbino in March of 1507, but the work was not published until 1528 after going through several phases of re-elaboration.