Book of the Courtier

Book of the Courtier

Castiglione’s discussion of the manners of the perfect courtier (1528). [Ital. Lit.: EB, II: 622]
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Eugenia Paulicelli's Writing Fashion in Early Modern Italy is divided into three parts, each containing two chapters, which trace the representation of fashion and its role in reinforcing and "fashioning" cultural norms in Castiglione's The Book of the Courtier, Cesare Vecellio and Giacomo Franco's costume books, and Arcangela Tarabotti and Agostino Lampugnani's critical and satirical considerations.
The Book of the Courtier, or Il Cortigiano, by Baldassare Castiglione, which has the famous scene toward the end that Shakespeare stole for his last scene of The Merchant of Venice.
Drawing on both Machiavelli's The Prince and Castiglione's The Book of the Courtier, Balthazar presents an informally written book designed to guide the beginning political staffer.
4) Scholars have described Castiglione's text, both in its original Italian form and in the English translation of Edward Doby as The Book of the Courtier (1561), as "the most important book of the European Renaissance" and "the most influential and widely read courtesy book in late Tudor England" (Morini 65; Javitch 197).
Discussion of the Renaissance starts with the cinquecento, moving from celebrated manuals of manners and mores such as Baldassare Castiglione's The Book of the Courtier (1528) and Giovanni della Casa's Galateo (1558) to the splendour of the Elizabethan court, where the Queen's beauty hid a literally deadly secret: in those days the most widely used cosmetic was the highly poisonous Venetian ceruse, made by exposing lead plates to the vapours of vinegar.
If The Book of the Courtier, the etiquette guide penned by the sixteenth-century Italian diplomat Baldassare Castiglione, is known at all today, it's probably for its coinage of sprezzatura, a word it uses to describe a very particular, and very practiced, mode of nonchalance.
Castiglione's The Book of the Courtier (Il Libro del Cortegiano): A Classic in the Making.
In The Book of the Courtier, Baldassar Castiglione reported a series of conversations which were supposed to have taken place at the court of Guidobaldo da Montefeltro Duke of Urbino in March of 1507, but the work was not published until 1528 after going through several phases of re-elaboration.
This new use of the studia humanitatis, drawing on the classical tradition and on Cicero in particular, was significantly mediated for Renaissance England by Castiglione's Book of the Courtier.
The discussion on language in the first book of the Courtier proposed a number of basic principles that undermine the technical nature of scholastic debate.
She also examines two mid-sixteenth century portrait treatises, by Francisco de Hollanda and Gabriele Paleotti, that deal with these issues explicitly and at length, as well as instructional books of manners for a general audience, such as Baldassare Castiglione's Book of the Courtier.
THAT PIETRO BEMBO IS REMEMBERED at all today, at least in Britain, is because he was thrice-immortalized: by the love letters he exchanged with Lucrezia Borgia; by being the character in Castiglione's The Book of the Courtier who makes the great speech on platonic love; by giving his name to a font.