boomer

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boomer

Austral a large male kangaroo

boomer

[′büm·ər]
(engineering)
A device used to tighten chains on pipe or other equipment loaded on a truck to make the cargo secure.
(mining engineering)
In placer mining, an automatic gate in a dam that holds the water until the reservoir is filled, then opens automatically and allows the escape of such a volume that the soil and upper gravel of the placer are washed away.
References in periodicals archive ?
Side note: The clever names actually describe how most boomers have felt about their money over the last 18 months, wouldn't you agree?
They have, for better and worse, functioned as a means by which some influential boomers might, surreptitiously, assign themselves a central place, even an epic role, in a history that in fact did more to shape them than they it.
Boomers have a history of "living the good life," pumping almost $200 million into the economy each year
The Baby Boomers, will also add to the growth of suburban development by renovating their current homes.
Baby boomers are permanently changing society, and there are implications for a variety of sectors, including long-term care," says LaRhae Knatterud, director of Aging Transformation for the state's Department of Human Services.
Employers are realizing it is in their best interest to encourage boomers to keep working beyond age 65.
The current mythology about boomers is that it's a 'me' generation, totally selfish people,'' said Jack Feuer, national news editor at Adweek.
Supplemental survey: a nationwide sample of 2,293 retired middle-income Boomers (581 from the Midwest) to assess the percentage of retired Boomers who are working in retirement.
In many respects, differences among Boomers are driven by life stage.
As boomers retire, the market's risk premium (or earnings yield) is expected to near 8 percent by 2026.
For this research, SymphonyIRI breaks the group into two segments: older boomers, born 1946-1955, and younger boomers, born 1956-1964, to capture their distinct cultural experiences, lifestyles and attitudes.
An overwhelming number of both Millennials (90%) and Boomers (86%) routinely research products online.