Boon


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Idioms, Wikipedia.

Boon

 

the woody part of stalks, obtained as by-products in the primary processing (braking and scutching) of fiber plants, such as flax, hemp, kenaf, dogbane, and ramie, to free the fibers from the stock. Boon, which makes up 65–70 percent of the mass of a bast stalk, consists principally of cellulose (45–58 percent), lignin (21–29 percent), and pentosans (23–26 percent). Structural and insulation slabs, pulp, and paper are manufactured from boon.

References in classic literature ?
And now, O king," he said, "take me to my couch that we may lie down and enjoy the blessed boon of sleep.
Even so has Achilles flung aside all pity, and all that conscience which at once so greatly banes yet greatly boons him that will heed it.
No greater boon could I ask, no greater honour could I crave, no greater happiness could I hope.
Availing himself of his friendly relations with Pierre as a boon companion, Dolokhov had come straight to his house, and Pierre had put him up and lent him money.
That passionate breast no longer asked for life; but for one boon it craved: to see Peter show bad form before it was cold forever.
and so on, but the pursuit was delayed while they discussed who should march in front, and this gave Duchess Brownie time to cast herself before the Queen and demand a boon.
But whilst he was congratulating himself on having such a nice story to tell to his boon companion, Jacob, that worthy was on his road to Delft; and, thanks to the swiftness of the horse, had already the start of Rosa and her companion by four leagues.
But what is this boon, rogue, which you would crave?
On that road we heard the song of morning stars; we drank in fragrances aerial and sweet as a May mist; we were rich in gossamer fancies and iris hopes; our hearts sought and found the boon of dreams; the years waited beyond and they were very fair; life was a rose-lipped comrade with purple flowers dripping from her fingers.
This fortune was a great boon to him; for, though he might have made millions of dollars by exploiting two or three of his chemical discoveries relative to new processes of dyeing, it was always repugnant to him to use for his own private gain the wonderful gift of invention he had received from nature.
I thought of how many happy people there were in Europe, Asia, and America, and everywhere, who were sleeping peacefully in their beds, and did not have to get up and see the Rigi sunrise--people who did not appreciate their advantage, as like as not, but would get up in the morning wanting more boons of Providence.
These scientific men," Lady Anselman declared, "are great boons to the country, but as parent I am afraid they are just a little thoughtless.