Border Leicester Breed

Border Leicester Breed

 

a breed of meat and wool sheep developed in England in the middle of the 19th century by crossing Leicester sheep with Cheviots. The animals are large and well built, with long bodies and broad, even backs. The liveweight of rams is 90–100 kg and of ewes, 60–70 kg. The wool is uniform and of 46–56 quality; it is soft, has an attractive luster, and is 20–25 cm long. Rams yield 5–6 kg of wool; ewes, 3–3.5 kg. Fertility is as great as 170 lambs per 100 ewes. The Border Leicester breed is used primarily for industrial crossing. The crossbred sheep have better body build, meat quality, and milk production, and they mature more rapidly. For this reason the Border Leicester breed has been introduced into India, Norway, and Japan. Small numbers of them have been introduced into the USSR.

S. V. BUILOV

References in periodicals archive ?
The sheep breed was a New Zealand Coopworth, which is a stabilised Romney cross Border Leicester breed.
The Border Leicester breed has what it takes for commercial operations, meat sales or handspinners.
The ABLA has been serving the Border Leicester breed since 1973.