Borg

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Borg

Björn . born 1956, Swedish tennis player: Wimbledon champion 1976--80

Borg

A type of cyborg in Star Trek that devours everything in its path. Companies that dominate their field are called Borgs, and Borging is the verb. See cyborg.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dobbs, himself a Conservative peer, has confirmed that he is working with the Borgen creator on a new show for the BBC.
Within Corporates & Institutions there is better return from customers other than shipping and therefore the capital will be used for them, Borgen was quoted yesterday as saying by Danish newswire Ritzau Finans.
The Welshman was downed by Keni Fisilau but managed to flip an off-load to the supporting Andy Borgen who went over for his third try of the season.
Andy Borgen is probably somebody who is equally adept at 12 or 10.
Moreover, research has demonstrated the combined utility of Holland-theme-organized vocational interests and self-efficacy (Betz & Borgen, 2000) in explaining occupational and educational choices.
ZBY502) MICHAEL BORGEN - NAVELLIER & ASSOCIATES INC.
We're seeing a growing number of smaller stores that are served by wholesalers getting into floral for the first time, and they are using very small merchandisers to get started," says Bill Carlson, vice president of marketing for Des Moines, Iowa-based Borgen Systems.
The concert features singer Solveig Borgen and a 20-piece orchestra under the musical director of Matthew Jones.
That is not to say that all of our volunteers are part of that profile," explained Jennifer Borgen, deputy press secretary for the Peace Corps, "but the vast majority are.
Role conflict and ambiguity, that is, lack of clarity as to what is expected, appropriate, or effective behavior, may be brought about by lack of communication about job expectation and roles, conflict with coworkers or supervisors (Decker & Borgen.
When she began updating her first home, Borgen found furniture and accessories at garage sales, flea markets, and outlet stores.
Research in this area is relatively recent (Morgan & Foster, 1999), and the literature has described barriers to reentry women that include financial problems, lack of self-confidence, and institutional administrative procedures (Killy & Borgen, 2000; Morgan & Foster, 1999, Padula, 1994; Pitts, 1992).