Borges

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Borges

Jorge Luis . 1899--1986, Argentinian poet, short-story writer, and literary scholar. The short stories collected in Ficciones (1944) he described as "games with infinity"
References in periodicals archive ?
As the multiple examples in these two short novels indicate, the protagonists, like their Borgesian predecessors, arduously struggle against the concept that the universe is random, chaotic, and devoid of meaning.
However, unlike the historians of the short story whom Kohan sees as symbolizing the textual construction of history in opposition to the embodiment of it ("El Enigma" 42), the protagonists of El Informe embark on a different, but no less Borgesian, argument about historiography.
At the same time, the Borgesian vision of a universe of interconnected texts that make playthings of their writers and readers allows him to take philosophical distance from this search and transform it into a new and captivating text.
The books and authors read by Usher (Machiavelli and, arguably, Swedenborg apart) may appear a shade peripheral to the Western literary canon, but they are still certainly part of it, and in its eclectic sweep across nations, centuries, languages and genres, Usher's library may be viewed as the direct harbinger of its celebrated Borgesian successors.
The idea of gathering and assembling authentic historical material, pseudo-historical sources, and original stories that are inspired by the Borgesian fantastic, and moreover of presenting all of them in the form of a dictionary, is in itself rather subversive with regard to readers' standard expectations.
Together, these Borgesian auroras illustrate the endless diagrammatic possibilities of the digital syllable.
A sharp phylogenetic break between action driven by instinct and action chosen through the production and selection of options from a Borgesian library of possibilities seems contrary to the evidence of both ethology and cognitive neuroscience.
The Quest for Anthropological Relevance: Borgesian Maps and Other Epistemological Pitfalls.
So we might conclude, with Ecclesiastes, that there is nothing truly new, or original, under the sun; everything has already been thought or said by someone, somewhere, at some time, and even the deferral of meaning has its place in some grand table of interpretive preferences imagined by a Borgesian master.
Intertextuality in Beatriz Viterbo, an approach to the borgesian character's configuration
This tour de force provides a Borgesian conclusion to "Mixed Genre," a chapter covering tragicomedy, romance, mock epic, and pastoral.