Borovoi

(redirected from Borovoy)
Also found in: Wikipedia.

Borovoi

 

an urban-type settlement in Kemerovo Oblast, RSFSR, 12 km north of Kemerovo. Population, 10,400 (1968). Coal mining (Kuznetsk basin).


Borovoi

 

an urban-type settlement in Verkhniaia Kama Raion, Kirov Oblast, RSFSR, 68 km northwest of the Verkhniaia Kama railroad station on the Iar-Lesnoi branch of the Kirov-Glazov line. Population, 3,500 (1968). There is a logging and timber distribution establishment.

References in periodicals archive ?
Borovoy (Moscow Patriarchate; member of the commission and later a member of the Secretariat on Faith and Order)
Based on my years of experience with patent portfolios of emerging semiconductor companies, Transphorm's is the best and most complete I have ever encountered," remarked Roger Borovoy, Transphorm's IP counsel from Fish & Richardson.
Civil rights leader Alan Borovoy visited in August 1962 and encouraged residents to create a political alliance to promote their interests.
See the WCC Central Committee's statement on "The Church, the Churches, and the World Council of Churches"; and Vitaly Borovoy, "The Eeclesiological Significance of the WCC: The Legacy and Promise of Toronto," The Ecumenical Review 40 (July-October, 1988): 504.
I quoted Alan Borovoy, general counsel of the Canadian Civil Liberties Union, who had recently condemned the complaints against me as abusive.
In their commentaries, Alan Borovoy, of the Canadian Civil Liberties Association, makes a case for independent auditing, and University of British Columbia law professor, Wes Pue, points out that in a regime marked by a considerable degree of discretion, distinctions between lawful and unlawful action can be essentially of "colourable intent" (p.
23) Similarly, Alan Borovoy, the founder of the Canadian Civil Liberties Association, expressed concern that human rights bodies are serving as "thought police, charged with stamping out all unpleasant arguments and ideas".
For example: Alan Borovoy, "Deportation Rules Test Canada's Sense of Fairness," Toronto Star, January 1, 1996, A 11; Jim Bronskill, "Lawyer Fears for Woman's Life," Ottawa Citizen, March 19, 1997, A1; Allan Thompson, "Immigration Bill Called 'Un-Canadian,'" Toronto Star, March 16, 2001, A6.
Her public position that the pursuit of equality requires the state to forcibly curtail speech that might be hurtful has earned her the enmity of Alan Borovoy, architect of Canada's human rights commissions.
Even Alan Borovoy, General Counsel for the Canada Civil Liberties Association and the de-facto dean of Canadian civil libertarians, argued that "no reasonable person can quarrel with the goal of this bill.
After September 11, he took critics of Bill C-36, such as Alan Borovoy of the Canadian Civil Liberties Association, to task for exclusively examining the bill "from the juridical optic of the domestic criminal law/due process model" (57) and not also as part of an international effort to achieve human rights and security.