Borrowed Days

Borrowed Days

March 29, 30, 31
According to an old Scottish rhyme, the last three days in March were "borrowed" from April, in return for which March promised to destroy three young sheep. But the weather proved to be an obstacle, and the promise was never fulfilled. Other references to the Borrowing Days go back even farther. Both an ancient calendar of the Church of Rome and a 1548 book known as the Complaynt of Scotland allude to the days at the end of March as being more like winter than spring. Whatever their origin, it seems likely that the wet, windy weather that so often comes at the end of March gave rise to the notion that this month had to "borrow" some additional time.
In the Scottish Highlands, there is an ancient belief that February 12, 13, and 14 were "borrowed" from January, and that it was a good omen for the rest of the year if the weather was as stormy as possible on these days. But if they were fair, no further good weather could be expected through the spring.
SOURCES:
BkDays-1864, vol. I, p. 448
DictDays-1988, p. 14
OxYear-1999, p. 144
References in periodicals archive ?
Now they show off the borrowed days of their lives.