Bosnia

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Bosnia

a region of central Bosnia-Herzegovina: belonged to Turkey (1463--1878), to Austria-Hungary (1879--1918), then to Yugoslavia (1918--91)
References in periodicals archive ?
with 87,332 inhabitants in 1991, some 41,000 of whom lived in the town centre and its surrounding suburbs (ICG, 2003: 3) Brcko was ethnically mixed comprising of 44,06 per cent Bosniaks, 25,39 per cent Croats, 20,68 per cent Serbs, and 10 per cent "Yugoslav and other" according to 1991 census (NSS Sarajevo, 234).
At CT/MR imaging, cystic RCCs appear as Bosniak category III/IV cysts with irregularly thickened, enhancing septations and solid components; cystic RCCs with extensive necrosis are mostly of clear cell type and demonstrates necrotic and hemorrhagic areas (Figure 5).
A few different themes emerged as being of central importance to the Bosniak community in Croatia prior to and during the process of European integration, including increased interest in and attention to the EU, its institutions, functioning, and laws, as well as to the values it represents.
The bodies were found in graves 400 metres from a bridge where 16 Bosniaks from Jablanica were killed in 1992.
Bosniak, supra note 1; Linda Bosniak, Constitutional Citizenship through the Prism of Alienage, 63 Ohio St.
Modern day Bosnia is predominantly made up of three ethnic groups: Bosniaks (48%), Serbians (37%) and Croats (14%) and, furthermore, each with their own respective religions.
Comprised of a Serb, a Croat and a Bosniak, the presidency, pinnacle of the power-sharing model, has been challenged by the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg.
875 Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland) Vatican City 1929 99/99 NA NA NA NA (1) Bosnia and Herzegovina has a collective presidency that alternates among three members (one Croat, one Bosniak Muslim, and one Serb).
A group of Croat and Bosniak art school students partnered with the film club at a Serb-majority school to exhibit their work at each other's American Corners.
Thanks to the imperfections in the country's election law, he in fact isn't even the representative of the country's Croat interests, since he was elected mainly by vote of the urban Bosniak population who far outnumber the Croats.
Although Bosnian had some currency as a designation of the language of some of the inhabitants of Bosnia, its emergence as the official designation of the language of the Bosniaks did not occur until the 1991 census and the official declaration by Bosnian and Herzegovinian Muslims that their self-declared ethnicity would from then on be Bosniak and their language Bosnian.