Bosnia

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Related to Bosniaks: Croats, Serbs

Bosnia

a region of central Bosnia-Herzegovina: belonged to Turkey (1463--1878), to Austria-Hungary (1879--1918), then to Yugoslavia (1918--91)
References in periodicals archive ?
With regards to such attitudes, Republika Srpska initially refused to participate in the deliberations of the arbitration panel and accused the Tribunal of favouring the Bosniak side (ICG 1997: 4).
While Bosniaks would like a more centralised and stronger state, Serb leaders in their own autonomous region are growing bolder in threats to secede.
But the United Nations also accepted a portion of blame for failing to protect the Bosniaks in Srebrenica, which in 1993 the UN Security Council had designated a "safe area".
An implicit argument that can be traced in the articles is that the values held by Bosniaks are broadly European values; therefore, they do have a legitimate place in a European democracy and in the EU.
TEHRAN (FNA)- Ten Bosnian Serb wartime officials were arrested on Tuesday over the killing of close to 70 Muslim Bosniak civilians and persecution of many more, including women and children, early in the former Yugoslav republic's 1992-95 war.
BelgradeCity, Safar 13, 1436, Dec 5, 2014, SPA -- Muslim Bosniak leader Bakir Izetbegovic stormed out
We assume the victims are Bosniaks from the nearby village Jablanica, the men aged from 19 to 57," Cengic said.
The mass grave contains victims of Bosnian Serb military units who killed Muslim Bosniaks and Roman Catholic Croats in hopes of creating an ethnically pure region.
Today, Krusevo has approximately 6,000 inhabitants-Macedonians, Vlachs, Albanians, Bosniaks, Turks and Serbs.
Croats and Slovenes are traditionally Catholic, Serbs and Macedonians Eastern Orthodox, while Bosniaks and most Albanians Muslim.
After the 1992-95 war, Bosnia was split into two autonomous regions, the federation dominated by Muslim Bosniaks and Croats, and the Serb Republic.
A common problem in many rural areas is a "two schools under one roof" system, where Croats, Serbs and Bosniaks, share one school building but function as completely separate entities.