gray mold

(redirected from Botrytis cinerea)
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gray mold

[′grā ‚mōld]
(plant pathology)
Any fungus disease characterized by a gray surface appearance of the affected part.
References in periodicals archive ?
Noting that quality controllers at Dutch flower auctions will lower prices by up to 50% for damaged goods, he says that bent stems, uneven openings and a fungal infection known as Botrytis cinerea all directly impact sales values.
When Samuel Tinon, a sweet-wine maker in Bordeaux, decided to move to the Tokaji region of Hungary, he was ready to make wine from its Aszu (dried up' or 'dried out') grapes--grapes attacked by the desirable botrytis cinerea, or noble rot.
Another problem where Terramera's neem products are proving effective is against the fungi Fusarium oxysporum, Botrytis cinerea and Erysiphe nectator, also known as powdery mildew.
Characters of aerated compost tea from immature compost that limit colonization of bean leaflets by Botrytis cinerea.
Microbial transformation of geraniol and nerol by Botrytis cinerea.
uk Noble rot, while sounding horrible, is actually the benevolent form of a grey fungus, Botrytis cinerea, affecting grapes.
With the increasing call by the public to limit chemical use on plants and the ineffectiveness of fungicides due to resistance developed by Botrytis cinerea, Dr Abu Qamar's research team began studying genetic resistance to provide a sustainable alternative to chemical control.
The purple tomatoes were also less susceptible to one of the most important postharvest diseases, grey mould caused by Botrytis cinerea.
In the moist morning atmosphere the ripe grapes are infected by a fungus - botrytis cinerea.
Single spore of Botrytis cinerea isolate A5 (isolated from infected tomato in greenhouse of Hamedan Province, Iran,) maintained at 22 [degrees]C on PDA.
guilliermondii sobre o desenvolvimento de Botrytis cinerea em tomates e observaram que, o maior efeito inibitorio foi conseguido quando a levedura foi inoculada 24h antes da inoculacao de B.
Indeed, in studies at laboratories in Aberdeen, Idaho; Wapato, Washington; and Parlier, California, ARS scientists have reported success in pitting Muscodor against some top agricultural foes: Tilletia fungi that cause bunt diseases of wheat; potato tuber moths and apple codling moths; and the gray mold fungus Botrytis cinerea, which attacks grapes.