Bourdon tube


Also found in: Medical.

Bourdon tube

[′bu̇r·dən ′tüb]
(engineering)
References in periodicals archive ?
3) “An Uncertainty Analysis of Fluke Calibration Fused-Quartz Bourdon Tube Pressure Products”
The Bourdon tube developed by Eugene Bourdon in 1849 is still the most common method for mechanical pressure measurement in the oil and gas industry.
These were based on the principle of barometers and utilised a Bourdon Tube, a hollow metal tube with a sealed distal end.
Furthermore, the pressure at the suction and discharge of the compressor was measured with separate bourdon tube pressure gauges.
Under laboratory test conditions, the 316L stainless steel Sta-Kool cooling element was able to reduce 400DegF (204DegC) liquid process temperatures to 100DegF (38DegC) at the active portion of the Bourdon tube.
As a result, bourdon tube pressure sensors, which have been in the market for more than 100 years, are facing stiff competition and losing market share to electronic pressure sensors such as the piezoelectric, capacitance and strain gauge sensors.
These lower pressures are transmitted to a silicone dampened helical Bourdon tube which is connected directly to the pointer shaft.
The operation and design of pressure gauges dates back to the mid-1800s when Eugene Bourdon invented the Bourdon tube.
Xmitr with LZT Sensor is a pressure gauge that works (with a noncontact displacement sensor) by measuring the tip travel of a Bourdon tube.
Tenders are invited for Pressure Gauge, Case Ss304, Gear Movement Ss304, Connection: Ss304, Bourdon Tube Ss316, Fitting: 1/2 Inch Bsp, Range 0-1400 Kg/Cm2, Dial Dia: 2.
The sensors for pressure measurement were bourdon tube pressure gauges and the pressure transducers powered by a 24 Volt DC supply; sensors used for the measurement of temperature were type T (copper-constantan) thermocouples.
Both the socket and bourdon tube are constructed of 316 stainless steel.