Bovidae


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Bovidae

[′bō·və‚dē]
(vertebrate zoology)
A family of pecoran ruminants in the superfamily Bovoidea containing the true antelopes, sheep, and goats.

Bovidae

 

a family of mammals of the order Artiodactyla. Unlike the Cervidae (deer), the Bovidae have hollow horns that rest on projections of the frontal bones and that grow and are not replaced during the animal’s life. Upper incisors and canines are absent; the molars have crescent-shaped enamel ridges on the chewing surface. The stomach is complex and multichambered, and the cecum is well developed. The family Bovidae includes cattle, goats, sheep, and antelopes.

References in periodicals archive ?
Furthermore, among the Bovidae on list a is an inclusion that truly perplexes and even amuses the zoological perspective, that of the kouprey (Bos sauveli), a small Asian wild cattle.
Morphological correlates of dietary resource partitioning in the African bovidae.
To the Editor: Malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) is an often lethal viral disease of susceptible biungulates from the Bovidae, Cervidae, and Suidae subfamilies.
Yak (Bos grunniens), the multipurpose bovid which provides milk, meat, wool and much- needed pack capability on precipitous slopes, belongs to the sub-family Bovine of the family Bovidae.
Oreamnos (Caprinae, Bovidae, Artiodactyla), from the Irvingtonian (Pleistocene) of Porcupine Cave, Colorado, North America.
Morphology of horns and fighting behavior in the family Bovidae.
The domestic animals raised would have been, mainly, herds of bovidae (Bos taurus), flocks of ovidae-capridae (Ovis aries and Capra hircus) and, to a lesser extent, suidae (Sus domesticus).
The families found to harbor the most risk zoonoses (excluding Hominidae because, by definition, they are capable of harboring all zoonotic diseases) were Muridae (Old World mice and rats, gerbils, whistling rats, and relatives), 21 risk zoonoses; Cricetidae (New World rats and mice, voles, hamsters, and relatives), 20; Canidae (coyotes, dogs, foxes, jackals, and wolves), 16; and Bovidae (antelopes, cattle, gazelles, goats, sheep, and relatives) and Felidae (cats), 15 each.