boxcar

(redirected from Box Cars)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.

boxcar

[′bäks‚kär]
(communications)
One of a series of long signal-wave pulses which are separated by very short intervals of time.
(engineering)
A railroad car with a flat roof and vertical sides, usually with sliding doors, which carries freight that needs to be protected from weather and theft.
References in periodicals archive ?
All racers ride alone in dual-seated soap box cars made by the Cleveland Soap Box Derby.
18 /PRNewswire/ -- Mattel, the world's largest toy company, next month is expected to announce a major initiative in consumer software and interactive products tied to such household names as Barbie, Match Box Cars and Cabbage Patch dolls, an executive said in an exclusive interview appearing in the December 18 issue of CMP's Computer Retail Week.
It will collect approximately two million tons of various grades of wastepaper and corrugated cartons this year, enough to fill more than 34,000 railroad box cars.
Next to him are the stock and super stock soap box cars.
Plants in the United States and Mexico manufacture a full line of railcars, including tank cars, hoppers, box cars, gondolas, intermodal cars and auto carriers as well as railcar components.
The Parker facility has the capacity to handle rail to truck shipments utilizing intermodal containers, box cars, and the Company's patented Lift Liners(TM).
Set up in May by Deputies Steve Harbeson and Fred Hill, the group has grown to encompass four soap box cars and 20 children picked from local schools to participate in the program.
Lat-Lon specializes in solutions for rail industry monitoring, hazmat tank cars, refrigerated box cars, commuter passenger trains, locomotives and specialized non-rail solutions.
Primarily box cars, vans, utility trucks and passenger cars.
queuing up for free stew, or being shoved into box cars, or crouched
These veteran speedsters, piloting their own custom machines, will be joined by area youngsters competing in generic Soap Box cars for their first taste of motorsports competition.
Buckton, wrote Douglass in the Aslef Journal, "suggested I was 'quite mad' but said he wouldn't be looking and the driver, he was sure, wouldn't notice 2,000 unofficial hobos in the box cars.