box office

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box office

A room or booth with one or more windows facing a theater lobby or public area; used for sale of tickets.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chuck Viane will be honored on May 9th at the Boxoffice (R) Awards ceremony at the Geneva Convention, one of the exhibition industry's largest conventions.
By teaming with the Geneva Convention we will be able to bring all of the resources of our combined organizations to create an event that will become one of the preeminent gatherings in the exhibition industry," said Peter Cane, publisher of Boxoffice Magazine.
This new relationship with Boxoffice Magazine gives NATO members the benefit of Boxoffice Magazine's comprehensive coverage of the industry, and permits us to concentrate on other members services, confident that Boxoffice will keep our members well informed in this competitive industry," said John Fithian, president and CEO of NATO.
cities and towns, the Ang Lee-directed film vaulted to the top of the national boxoffice charts on Tuesday to rank as the #1 film in America.
Black actors such as Eddie Murphy, Will Smith, Wesley Snipes and Denzel Washington have long demonstrated their commercial viability by crossing over at the boxoffice.
The director who successfully refashioned Liam Neeson into a boxoffice powerhouse with Taken attempts the same trick on Sean Penn who, don't forget, hasn't had a hit in about 10 years.
The digital movie rental service, BoxOffice has been introduced by MultiChoice in Kenya.
The film took an extraordinary opening in the United States and featured at 12th position in the US boxoffice chart this weekend, according to film critic and trade analyst Taran Adarsh.
MultiChoice officially launched BoxOffice this week in what the cable company said is yet another move to provide DStv subscribers with the ultimate in home television entertainment.
The phenomenon of multiple auditoriums in a single movie theatre complex (now known more commonly as a "multiplex") became the mainstream of American film exhibition by the 1970s, but the practice was a novel one in 1962, one that trade publication Boxoffice in February of that year called "a revolutionary concept in screen entertainment" ("Twin Cinema" E-1).
With last week's launch of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows - Part One leaving cash tills around the world ringing, it'll be intriguing to see if anything can challenge the young wizard for a share of boxoffice gold.
5%, when compared with the same period the previous year, with boxoffice takings ahead by 8.