brachial plexus

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Related to Brachial plexus injuries: Erb's palsy, brachial plexus paralysis

brachial plexus

[′brā·kē·əl ′plek·səs]
(neuroscience)
A plexus of nerves located in the neck and axilla and composed of the anterior rami of the lower four cervical and first thoracic nerves.
References in periodicals archive ?
2] Earlier studies have estimated that the incidence of brachial plexus injuries approaches 5% in motorcycle and snowmobile accidents and one study found an incidence of brachial plexus injuries of 26% in the 2010 Canadian football season .
Brachial plexus injuries usually involve either pre-ganglionic avulsion or post-ganglionic rupture.
Defendants often claim that these injuries are unrelated to, and independent of, shoulder dystocia, citing a 1998 study that concluded that 78 percent of permanent brachial plexus injuries did not involve shoulder dystocia.
Other terms commonly used to describe brachial plexus injuries include: Erb's Palsy (upper trunk injury); Klumpke's Palsy (lower trunk injury); Brachial Plexus Palsy; Erb-Duchenne Palsy; Homer's Syndrome (when facial nerves are also affected); and "Burners" or "Stingers" (usually associated with sports-related brachial plexus injuries).
Some obstetrical experts say brachial plexus injuries in newborns can be caused by uterine contractions alone.
Nath is a reconstructive microsurgeon specializing in the treatment of brachial plexus injuries, winging scapula injuries, prostate nerve injuries, foot drop, facial paralysis, and nerve tumors.
With advancement in microsurgical techniques by Narakas, (31) Millessi, (32) Gilbert and Tassin, (2) Kawabata and colleagues, (33) and others, interest in the microsurgical reconstruction of brachial plexus injuries grew.
The study describes a statistical model for predicting shoulder dystocia that identified over 50% of cases with brachial plexus injuries along with an acceptable low false positive rate of 2.
After adjustment for delivery mode, vaginal delivery of infants that were large for gestational age had a higher risk of skeletal, spinal, clavicular, and brachial plexus injuries, with an odds ratio (OR) of 1.
Studies report the incidence of obstetric brachial plexus injuries in the United States to be 0.
Nath specializes in treating brachial plexus injuries, winging scapula injuries, prostate nerve injuries, foot drop, facial paralysis, and nerve tumors.
Most brachial plexus injuries will recover; those that do not result in permanent weakness or paralysis in the arm.