Bragg curve

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Bragg curve

[′brag ‚kərv]
(atomic physics)
A curve showing the average number of ions per unit distance along a beam of initially monoenergetic ionizing particles, usually alpha particles, passing through a gas. Also known as Bragg ionization curve.
A curve showing the average specific ionization of an ionizing particle of a particular kind as a function of its kinetic energy, velocity, or residual range.
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Thus the random intensity at a particular [omega] is proportional to an integral over the Bragg peak scan, the integration limits (2[[theta].
The effect of spread in the sample structure on the Bragg peak shape is also investigated.
The physics of charged particles is such that there is always a lower entrance dose and, after a bragg peak at a depth specific to the particle, there is no exit dose.
The unique Bragg Peak characteristic of particle beams provides the most precise delivery of treatments available today.
Unlike the case with photon and gamma-ray therapy, most of the energy delivered during charged-particle radiotherapy is absorbed at the end of the particles' path through tissue (the Bragg peak phenomenon).
It eventually reaches a maximum called the Bragg peak close to the end of its trajectory.
3 is defined relative dosimetry system, while Task 4 specifies the chamber to measure the Bragg peak proton beam.
For example, a good understanding of the profile line shape through a fundamental parameters technique pays dividends in obtaining a good fit to the Bragg peak shape.
The scattering for a nuclear Bragg peak always preserves the spin alignment of the neutron (non-spin-flip scattering), while the magnetic cross sections depend on the relative orientation of the neutron polarization P and the reciprocal lattice vector [tau].
In an ideal modulated structure, each spot, including t he satellites, is a Bragg peak, indexed with more than three, usually four, numbers.
One clearly observes that the diffraction Bragg peaks broaden, with increasing milling time.
Figure 2 shows the [theta]-2[theta] XRD patterns of the TiN/TiSiN and CrN/CrSiN coatings with the Bragg peaks being labeled with the corresponding phases and lattice planes.