Braggadocchio

Braggadocchio

empty braggart. [Br. Lit.: Faerie Queene]
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38), but there is a danger in such an approach of reducing allegory to a code and of failing to tolerate the density of the fiction itself, as in the treatment of the `forrest greene' into which Braggadocchio and Trompart flee (pp.
So when Belphoebe defeats Braggadocchio in Book II, Spenser is endorsing the Queen's attack on 'the frivolous life of pleasure', hoping to celebrate the nation, Virgilian style, and direct his reader to 'the central tenets of Christian theology', rooting 'these somewhat contradictory ideals in the concrete particulars of the Elizabethan court' (100).
The witch, however, then creates a counterfeit Florimell, who is borne away one day by Braggadocchio, only to have her taken from him by another knight.
He returns to his buried treasure, only to find that it has been stolen by the servant of Braggadocchio.
At this point arrives Sir Ferraugh with the false Florimell he had taken from Braggadocchio.