Brahmo Samaj


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Brahmo Samaj

(brä`mō səmäj`) [Hindi,=society of God], Indian religious movement, founded in Kolkata (Calcutta) in 1828 by Rammohun RoyRoy, Rammohun
, 1772–1833, Indian religious and educational reformer. Sometimes called the father of modern India, Roy was born to a wealthy and devout Brahman family in Bengal.
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. It promoted a monotheistic, reformed Hinduism with strong Islamic and Christian overtones, support for the rights of women, and opposition to such aspects of Hinduism as idolatry and animal sacrifice. Under Roy the organization attained considerable importance in E India until his death in 1833. After a decade of decline, it was revived by Debendranath Tagore in 1843. A schism divided the organization in 1865, when Keshub Chunder Sen split with Tagore and formed the Adi Brahmo Samaj, and in 1878 Sen's group itself divided. Sen's followers formed a new church, the Nava-Vidhana, while the dissidents founded the Sadharan Brahmo Samaj, which became dominant. The Brahmo Samaj movement had great influence in the 19th cent., but although it still exists, it has had little impact on 20th-century Hinduism.

Bibliography

See P. K. Sen, Biography of a New Faith (2 vol., 1950–54); K. C. Sen, The Voice of Keshub (1963); P. V. Kanal, An Introduction to Dev-Samaj (1965).

Brahmo Samaj

 

(Bengali, “Society of Brahma”), a reformatory and instructional religious society founded in Bengal (India) in 1828 by Rammohan Roy. The society campaigned against the caste system, early marriages, and other foundations of Hinduism and feudalism, and favored the spread of European enlightenment throughout India and the encouragement of industrial and scientific progress. With the development of the bourgeois nationalist movement early in the 20th century, the movement ceased to play an important role in the social life of Bengal.

References in periodicals archive ?
The following year, Debendranath Tagore established an "Ashram" at that place and he himself became the initiator for the Brahmo Samaj - the worshiper of one supreme God.
Many of these spokespersons' ideological lineages can be traced to the neo-Vedantic universalisms of the eighteenth-century religious reformer Rammohan Roy and his Hindu-Unitarian society of the Brahmo Samaj.
The ecumenical and universalistic neo-Vedantic ideas of the Brahmo Samaj, which fascinated American Unitarians as early as Rammohan Roy's articles in the Christian Register, profoundly influenced the tendency of contemporary transnational gurus to supplant Hindu religiosity with Advaita Vedantic universalistic spirituality.
Anonymous, 1926, Leaders of the Brahmo Samaj, Madras: G.
Later, while those from the Brahmo Samaj (5) referred to the new style of wearing the sari with blouse and chador as the "Thakurbarir sari" (sari worn in the style of the Tagores, a leading Brahmo family), as more and more Brahmos started wearing the sari in this manner, it came to be popularly known as the "Brahmika sari" throughout India.
5) The Brahmo Samaj was established in 1843 by Debendranath Tagore and emerged out of Rammohun Roy's Brahmo Sabha (1830); deeply influenced by Unitarianism, it was committed to rational worship as the basis of religion, social reform, and active work among the poor.
Wright does not mention that Rammohun was instrumental in the creation of the Brahmo Samaj, an important society in nineteenth-century India, which preached the deep cultural and philosophical bonds among different religious groups in India.
Much of Emerson's literary currency among educated Indians in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries may be credited to the work of the religious society known as the Brahmo Samaj ("The Society of God") and specifically to the propagation of his writings after 1855 by the American Unitarian missionary, Charles H.
After a decade of decline following Roy's death in 1833, the Brahmo Samaj was revived by Devendranath Tagore (1817-1905) in 1843.
Born Narendranath Datta, Vivekananda was a Western-educated Bengali who belonged to the Brahmo Samaj during his college years, shared its liberal Unitarian-oriented religious principles, and strongly supported its agenda for social reform.
By the late 19th century, the impact of Christianity led some Hindu reformers to take new looks at their own religion, and several new Hindu-based movements emerged, among them the Brahmo Samaj and the Ramakrishna Mission, which became active in welfare and educational work.
Debendranath Tagore was himself an influential Bengali and member of the Brahmo Samaj a group that sought to reform and modernise Hinduism -- a movement that deeply influenced his son.