cerebral hemisphere

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cerebral hemisphere

[sə′rē·brəl ′hem·ə‚sfir]
(cell and molecular biology)
Either of the two lateral halves of the cerebrum.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to paired t -test (within groups) results, there were significant differences in the brain hemisphere treated with irradiation between preradiation period and all the time points after radiation treatment.
Neurologists have discovered that ADHD, dyslexia, autism, Asperger's syndrome, Torette's syndrome, obsessive-compulsive disorder, oppositional-defiant disorder, and many other learning disabilities all have the same underlying cause--Functional Disconnection Syndrome which is the imbalanced development of the two brain hemispheres (Melillo, 2009).
His special interest is cognitive neuroscience, and his empirical research has focused on the interaction of left and right brain hemispheres.
For average teens and college students, the left brain hemisphere performed the task faster for local matches while the right side was quicker at global matches.
In the 1970s, studies examining brain hemisphere differences and psi were conducted by a few researchers who used a similar experimental methodology: unselected participants took part in a forced-choice ESP task designed to activate one hemisphere while they simultaneously participated in a distracting task that would engage the other hemisphere (Broughton, 1976, 1977a; Maher, Peratsakis, & Schmeidler, 1979; Maher & Schmeidler, 1977).
Although the research does point to differences in the information-processing abilities and biases of the brain hemispheres, those differences are found at a finer level of analysis than "spatial reasoning.
Brain hemisphere preference is an accepted concept.
Coles debunks the explanations of neurological dysfunction, first proposed by Hinshelwood in the early 1900s, as well as the brain hemisphere dominance theory of Samuel Orton.
Most stroke survivors experience upper and lower extremity weakness on the side of their body opposite the brain hemisphere in which the stroke occurred.
html) a more developed right brain hemisphere , which is specialised for processes such as (http://psychology.
Jill Bolte Taylor, a neuroanatomist from Harvard's Department of Psychiatry who suffered a stroke that caused her left brain hemisphere to hemorrhage and consequently lose its function.
Benefits: Breathing through the right nostril tends to activate the left brain hemisphere and breathing through the left nostril tends to activate the right brain hemisphere.