Brainworm


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Brainworm

impersonates variety of characters in his trickery. [Br. Lit.: Every Man in His Humour]
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Experts say reducing deer numbers might help reduce the brainworm problem in moose.
The brainworm that is destroying the USA is a mutant version of the word "tax.
The disguises of Brainworm and Volpone are effective partly because of the audience's awareness of the disguises; no secrets there, but rather mimesis, one might say, to which the audience is privy.
Brainworm, Parelaphostrongylus tenuis in moose, Alces alces, and white-tailed deer, Odocoileus virginianus, of Nova Scotia.
Logging, commercial hunting, forest fires, and a nasty parasite called brainworm combined to drive the animal toward extinction.
A parasite called brainworm (you don't want to know) is pandemic among Wisconsin deer, which can tolerate it while moose cannot.
one that now matches Lovel's tenor of high seriousness', Brainworm, Tiberius, Dol, Subtle, and Face as professionals who remain aware of the fact of performance amid farcical amateurs who seek identification with their roles.
Indeed, just as the social parasitism of a Mosca or a Brainworm (whose names, of course, are carefully concocted to signal their natures) involves usurping the property of others, so the pursuit of Jonsonian imitation leads to what we could now call borderline plagiarism and misrepresentation.
The characters to whom the title applies are: Captain Bobadil, whose humour is bragging of his brave deeds and military courage, and who is thrashed as a coward by Downright; Kitely, whose humour is jealousy of his wife and who is befooled and cured by a trick played on him by Brainworm; Stephen, whose humour is verdant stupidity and who is played on by everyone; Kno ' well, whose humour is suspicion of his son; Dame Kitely, whose humour is jealousy of her husband, but she, like him, is cured by a trick devised by Brainworm.
For example, several successive Swedish studies of infectious diseases in moose including brainworm (Elciphostrongylus alces) and moose wasting syndrome involved calves obtained from the wild, and subsequently penned and raised in stalls (Steen et al.
Indeed, just as the social parasitism of a Mosca ora Brainworm (whose names, of course, are carefully concocted to signal their natures) involves usurping the property of others, so the pursuit of Jonsonian imitation leads to what we could now call borderline plagiarism and misrepresentation.
We deployed GPS collars on 26 adult moose (7 females and 19 males); 5 were excluded due to mortality, suspected infection with brainworm (Parelaphostrongylus tenuis), or collar failure.