Nehushtan

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Related to Brazen serpent: Nehushtan

Nehushtan

(nēhŭsh`tăn), in the Bible, brazen serpent made by Moses. It was eventually worshiped by the Israelites, and Hezekiah destroyed it.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Brazen Serpent appears in the background on the left.
Two motifs in particular, Christ in Judgment and the Brazen Serpent, mitigate the strict bisection the composition of Law and Gospel may suggest.
Ni Chuilleanain offers a literal example of such revival in 'Studying the Language', for she returns in this final poeta of The Brazen Serpent to her much earlier poem 'Celibates'.
The Brazen Serpent (Winston-Salem, North Carolina: Wake Forest University Press, 1995), pp.
In The Brazen Serpent and The Girl Who Married the Reindeer, you were dealing with personal issues, the death of your stepfather and your sister, followed shortly by the death of your mother.
The poems in The Brazen Serpent, a lot of them were begun in London while she was ill or quite soon after she died.
In the passionate and often unfinished volumes of his last sculptures, in the restless and flamelike action of his frescoes (especially such works as The Brazen Serpent .
Poems like 'Fireman's Lift', (53) 'The Architectural Metaphor', (54) and 'The Glass House', (55) from The Brazen Serpent, for example, direct the reader's attention inwards, into the silent interiors of buildings and their representation.
Ni Chuilteanain's emphasis on rooms and buildings, as well as on their connection to female figures, becomes central to our understanding of The Brazen Serpent (1994), a collection where the deaths of Ni Chuilleanain's mother and sister (7) create the tone, and where women's history and personal history intertwine.
In Ni Chuilleanain's poem 'The Real Thing', the Brazen Serpent is the reliquary of such meaning.
This essay is an exploration of the fertile yet contentious space of intersection between traditional religious faith, existentialist good faith, and aesthetics in Eilean Ni Chuilleanain's three most recent volumes, The Magdalene Sermon (1989), The Brazen Serpent (1994), and The Girl Who Married the Reindeer (2001).
In a poem such as 'A Hand, A Wood' from The Brazen Serpent, Ni Chuilleanain's mourning is also specifically tangible: 'After three days I have to wash--/ I am prising you from under my nails / Reluctantly' (p.