brazil nut

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Brazil nut,

common name for the Lecythidaceae, a family of tropical trees. It includes the anchovy pear (Grias cauliflora), a West Indian species with edible fruit used for pickles, and several lumber trees of South America, e.g., the cannon-ball tree (Couroupita guianensis), some species of Barringtonia, and the Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa). The latter is found chiefly in Brazil along the Amazon and Orinoco rivers, but extensive groves have also been planted in N Bolivia. The edible Brazil nuts grow clumped together in large, round, woody and extremely hard seed pods the size of a large grapefruit. The meat of the seed (the "nut") is very rich in oil. The Brazil nut family is classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Lecythidales.

Brazil nut

[brə′zil ‚nət]
(botany)
Bertholletia excelsa. A large broad-leafed evergreen tree of the order Lecythedales; an edible seed is produced by the tree fruit.

brazil nut

1. a tropical South American tree, Bertholletia excelsa, producing large globular capsules, each containing several closely packed triangular nuts: family Lecythidaceae
2. the nut of this tree, having an edible oily kernel and a woody shell
References in periodicals archive ?
Under the Food and Drug Administration's policy Nordlee's results would have required the soybeans' label to disclose that they "contain Brazil-nut protein," unless the company could ensure that the soybeans would never end up in tofu or other soy-based foods.
In this case, the company knew that the Brazil-nut protein could provoke an allergic response," says Marion Nestle, chair of the nutrition department at New York University, who wrote an editorial accompanying the report.
To create methionine-rich tobacco plants, Sun and his associates inserted into tobacco seeds a Brazil-nut gene coding for a protein high in methionine.

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